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Moving Towards a Research Informed Conceptual Model of Engineering Global Preparedness

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Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

International Division Technical Session 9

Tagged Division

International

Page Count

17

Page Numbers

24.917.1 - 24.917.17

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22850

Download Count

104

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Paper Authors

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Svetlana Levonisova University of Southern California

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Postdoctoral Research Associate
University of Southern California
Viterbi School of Engineering
Division of Engineering Education

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Shaobo Huang University of Southern California

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Shaobo Huang is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate in STEM Education in the School of Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC). With BS and MS degrees in electrical engineering, she received her Ph.D. in Engineering Education at Utah State University (USU). Her areas of interest include increasing retention rates in engineering, and improving academic performance of minority students in STEM disciplines.

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Scott C Streiner University of Pittsburgh

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Scott C. Streiner is a full-time doctoral student in the Industrial Engineering Department at the University of Pittsburgh. He conducts research in the field of globalized engineering, including studying offerings in international engineering education, and the extent to which these experiences improve global preparedness of engineering students. Currently, Streiner’s research focus is on how best to operationalize and evaluate global opportunities within the engineering curriculum.

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Sydnie Cunningham Cunningham The University of Tulsa

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Sydnie Cunningham is a PhD student of Industrial-Organizational Psychology at the University of Tulsa. Her research interests include diversity in the workplace, individual differences in the workplace, training, and teams.

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Gisele Ragusa University of Southern California

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Dr. Gisele Ragusa is an associate professor at the University of Southern California (USC) in the Viterbi School of Engineering in the Division of Engineering Education. She co-directs USC’s STEM Education Consortium. Her research interests and areas of expertise include: engineering education, engineering innovation and global preparedness, college access, STEM K-12 education and teacher education, STEM literacy education, as well as assessment and measurement in STEM education. She teaches courses in research design, measurement theory, critical pedagogy in STEM and courses in learning and instructional theory. She extensive expertise in assessment, psychometrics, advanced quantitative analyses, and multimodal research design. She is active in many professional associations in the engineering and science education, teacher education, distance learning, program evaluation and special education fields. She has been the principal investigator on several federal grants through the US Department of Education, the National Institute of Health, and the National Science Foundation.

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Mary E. Besterfield-Sacre University of Pittsburgh

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Dr. Mary Besterfield-Sacre is an Associate Professor and Fulton C. Noss Faculty Fellow in Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the Director for the Engineering Education Research Center (EERC) in the Swanson School of Engineering, and serves as a Center Associate for the Learning Research and Development Center. Her principal research is in engineering education assessment, which has been funded by the NSF, Department of Education, Sloan Foundation, Engineering Information Foundation, and NCIIA. Dr. Sacre’s current research focuses on three distinct but highly correlated areas – innovative design and entrepreneurship, engineering modeling, and global competency in engineering. She has served as an associate editor for the JEE; and is currently associate editor for the AEE Journal.

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Larry J. Shuman University of Pittsburgh Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/https://0000-0001-6884-7070

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Larry Shuman is senior associate dean for academic affairs and distinguished service professor of industrial engineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh. His research focuses on improving the engineering educational experience, emphasizing assessment of learning and problem solving abilities, and studying the ethical behavior of engineers and engineering managers. He has led the development of a very successful cooperative engineering education program and an innovative study abroad program. He is currently the Chair of the Global Engineering Exchange Executive Committee. Dr. Shuman is the founding editor of Advances in Engineering Education, and an ASEE Fellow. He holds a BSEE from the University of Cincinnati and a PhD in Operations Research from the Johns Hopkins University.

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Cheryl Matherly

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Dr. Cheryl Matherly is Vice Provost for Global Education and Applied Assistant Professor of Education at the University of Tulsa, where she has responsibility for the strategic leadership of the university’s plan for comprehensive internationalization. Dr. Matherly’ special area of interest is with the internationalization of science and engineering education, specifically as related to workforce development. She directs the NanoJapan program, funded by the National Science Foundation in order to expand international research opportunities for students in STEM fields. NanoJapan was recognized by the Institute for International Education in 2008 with the prestigious Andrew Heiskell Award for Innovations in Study Abroad. Dr. Matherly is the recipient of two Fulbright grants for international education administrators (Germany and Japan.) She has a BA in English and Political Science from the University of New Mexico, an MS in Education from Indiana University, and an Ed.D. in Education from the University of Houston. She teaches in the graduate program in education at The University of Tulsa.

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Abstract

Engineering Global Preparedness: Moving Towards a Conceptual ModelU.S. engineering programs are increasingly required to better prepare their students to operateeffectively in diverse international environments. As a consequence, accredited engineeringprograms must demonstrate that graduates possess “the broad education necessary to understandthe impact of engineering solutions in a global economic, environmental, and societal context.”Implied in this is an expectation that engineering programs begin to address “globalpreparedness.” Yet, little has been done to define engineering global preparedness, specifyalternatives for achieving global preparedness, or determining traits, prior experiences, orcurricular and extra-curricular activities that contribute to global preparedness.This paper presents results from the first phase of a project funded by the National ScienceFoundation that explores how international learning experiences (i.e., co- and extra-curricular)impact engineering students’ global preparedness. In particular, a study employing the Delphimethod was conducted in which 18 subject matter experts (SMEs) participated. The Delphi wasdesigned with three rounds that culminated with a voluntary face-to-face summit followed by afinal analytical and mapping synthesis. The process first asked participants to respond to twoopen-ended questions in which respondents characterize globally prepared engineers and thelearning experiences that help produce them. These responses were used to construct aquestionnaire that participants completed in the second round. From the SME responses areas ofconsensus and divergence were found. In the third round SMEs had the opportunity to revisetheir judgments and clarify reasons. These were then discussed at the voluntary face-to-facesummit, resulting in the identification of outcomes, programmatic elements believed to influencethe quality of intercultural and global experiences, as well as types of experiences. As part of thesummit, teams of SMEs created semantic maps of global engineering preparedness outcomes;and these were then further synthesized into a single map that was vetted by the SMEs during thefourth and final Delphi round.Results from this study provide a framework for global engineering education that may guidepractice with an emphasis on how engineering students acquire global preparedness and thecontextual and experiential factors that influence this acquisition.

Levonisova, S., & Huang, S., & Streiner, S. C., & Cunningham, S., & Ragusa, G., & Besterfield-Sacre, M. E., & Shuman, L. J., & Matherly, C. (2014, June), Moving Towards a Research Informed Conceptual Model of Engineering Global Preparedness Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. https://peer.asee.org/22850

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