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Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Experience in the Internet of Things: Student Outcomes, Faculty Perceptions, and Lessons Learned

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2018

Conference Session

Emerging Computing and Information Technologies I

Tagged Division

Computing & Information Technology

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

19

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/28696

Download Count

8

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Paper Authors

biography

Damla Turgut University of Central Florida

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Damla Turgut is an Associate Professor at the Department of Computer Science at University of Central Florida. She received her BS, MS, and PhD degrees from the Computer Science and Engineering Department of University of Texas at Arlington. Her research interests include wireless ad hoc, sensor, underwater and vehicular networks, as well as considerations of privacy in the Internet of Things. She is also interested in applying big data techniques for improving STEM education for women and minorities. She is PI and Co-PI for NSF-funded REU and RET programs respectively. Her recent honors and awards include 2017 University Excellence in Professional Service Award and being featured in the UCF Women Making History series in March 2015. She was co-recipient of the Best Paper Award at the IEEE ICC 2013. Dr. Turgut serves as a member of the editorial board and of the technical program committee of ACM and IEEE journals and international conferences. She is a member of IEEE, ACM, and the Upsilon Pi Epsilon honorary society.

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Lisa Massi University of Central Florida

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Dr. Lisa Massi is the Director of Operations Analysis for Accreditation, Assessment, & Data Administration in the College of Engineering & Computer Science at the University of Central Florida. She is Co-PI of 2 NSF-funded S-STEM programs and program evaluator for 2 NSF-funded REU programs. Her research interests include factors that impact student persistence, identity formation, and career development in the STEM fields.

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Salih Safa Bacanli University of Central Florida

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Salih Safa Bacanli is PhD student at Department of Computer Science, University of Central Florida (UCF). He received his MS degree in Computer Science from UCF and BS degree in Computer Engineering from Bilkent University, Turkey. His research interests include opportunistic networking routing, wireless sensor network routing and security. He is member of Upsilon Pi Epsilon honorary society,ASEE and Order or Engineer.

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Neda Hajiakhoond Bidoki University of Central Florida

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Neda Hajiakhoond Bidoki is a Ph.D student at the Department of Computer Science at University of Central Florida.
Her research interests includes machine learning, data analysis, computer networks, mobility models and network models and analysis. She received her M.Sc. in Network Engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology and her B.Sc. in Information Technology from Sharif University of Technology.

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Abstract

A Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site on the Internet of Things (IoT), funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), was established at a large public university to engage undergraduate students in a 10-week, immersive research experience. REU students conducted research in fields spanning security, privacy, hardware design, data analytics, healthcare simulations, and social computing. A common survey available to Principal Investigators (PIs) of REU sites in Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) was deployed to the 2016 summer cohort students at this REU IoT site. Results of the student pre- and post-surveys were statistically significant for the research skills and knowledge construct, but not significant for self-efficacy, intentions toward graduate school, attitudes toward the discipline of the assigned REU project, help seeking and coping behaviors, grit, scientific leadership, or scientific identity. A second evaluation was conducted, comparing student and faculty mentor post-survey scores on the self-efficacy construct. The results were not statistically significant, suggesting that students and faculty mentors had similar opinions on the ability of students to perform discrete research processes by the end of the REU. In this paper, we will describe the REU program recruitment strategy, structure, and activities; provide student contributions to the IoT research projects; discuss implications of our evaluation results; and share lessons learned. This paper may be especially interesting to faculty thinking about submitting a NSF REU CISE proposal and newly awarded PIs.

Turgut, D., & Massi, L., & Bacanli, S. S., & Hajiakhoond Bidoki, N. (2017, June), Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Experience in the Internet of Things: Student Outcomes, Faculty Perceptions, and Lessons Learned Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/28696

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