Asee peer logo

Nanoos Pilot: A Collection Of Ocean Observing Tools For Improving Ocean Safety And Coastal Design

Download Paper |

Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Ocean, Marine, and Coastal Engineering Topics

Tagged Division

Ocean and Marine

Page Count

5

Page Numbers

11.947.1 - 11.947.5

DOI

10.18260/1-2--1311

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1311

Download Count

80

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Merrick Haller Oregon State University

visit author page

Merrick Haller has been an Assistant Professor in the Ocean Engineering Program within the Department of Civil and Construction Engineering at Oregon State University since 2001. His research interests include the use of remote sensing tools for coastal engineering applications and the origin and dynamics of rip currents.

visit author page

biography

Antonio Baptista Oregon Health & Science University

visit author page

Antonio Baptista is a professor and director of the Center for Coastal and Land-Margin Research, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Oregon Graduate Institute. Dr. Baptista's research employs an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to studying coasts and land-margins. Specifically, he is interested in prediction of coastal hazards and environmental pathways at regional scales, tides and Tsunamis, hydraulic transport, estuarine geochemical modeling and land-water interactions.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

NANOOS-Pilot: a collection of ocean observing tools for improving ocean safety and coastal design

Abstract

The NANOOS-Pilot project (Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems) is an ongoing effort to develop coastal ocean observing assets for the integrated observation of the estuaries and shorelines of the Pacific Northwest. The project is actively building nowcast and predictive capabilities for this environment, as well as interactive access to archival data, real-time data, and selected forecasts. In addition to the potential benefits accrued to the many sectors that depend upon the coastal waters of the Pacific Northwest, there are a number of education opportunities related to ocean observatories involving undergraduate and graduate institutions, K-12 schools and adult literacy programs. In this work, we describe some ocean technology applications of the NANOOS-Pilot and focus on the educational use of the system in a senior-level Civil Engineering course on Coastal Infrastructure.

Background

The development of NANOOS will benefit many sectors that depend upon the coastal waters of the Pacific Northwest, including marine shipping; transport/spill remediation; search and rescue; fisheries and aquaculture; marine recreation; coastal county planners; natural resource managers; homeland security; and research and education institutions. These stakeholders will have access to the information and real-time environmental data we generate through a number of mechanisms, such as web and ftp sites, newsletters, and public presentations.

There are enormous education opportunities related to ocean observatories involving undergraduate and graduate institutions, K-12 schools and adult literacy programs. These institutions are important users of data and knowledge generated within the NANOOS-Pilot project. For example, real-time regionally specific oceanographic data can be used for interactive educational exhibits at museums, and science centers and these efforts will contribute to building a constituency of educated citizenry. In addition, the development of the national Integrated Ocean Observing System will bring benefits to coastal engineering practice, because it will be a tremendous source of site-specific environmental data for use in coastal design projects.

Finally, within the NANOOS-Pilot project we are developing unique remote sensing capabilities for coastal ocean observing based on X-band marine radar technology. Remote sensing technology offers the ability to sample large areas synoptically and non-intrusively and shore-based remote sensors offer much longer dwell times, while avoiding the problems of deploying in-situ instruments in difficult and sometimes hazardous sampling environments. Furthermore, shore-based systems are inherently more mobile and easily deployable than offshore buoys. We will describe our initial application of this technology at the mouth of the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest.

Summary of Ocean Observing Components

The leading partners in the NANOOS-Pilot project are:

Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries

Haller, M., & Baptista, A. (2006, June), Nanoos Pilot: A Collection Of Ocean Observing Tools For Improving Ocean Safety And Coastal Design Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--1311

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015