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Nanotechnology in Undergraduate Education: Development of Experimental Modules

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees

Page Count

15

Page Numbers

22.1093.1 - 22.1093.15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/18973

Download Count

29

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Paper Authors

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James Boerio University of Cincinnati

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F. James Boerio joined the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Cincinnati in 1970. His main research interests are in surface properties of materials, surface characterization, and adhesion. He currently serves as Director of the School of Engineering Education at the University of Cincinnati.

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Dionysios D. Dionysiou University of Cincinnati

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Professor Dionysiou is currently a Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science at the University of Cincinnati. He teaches courses on drinking water quality and treatment, advanced unit operations for water treatment, advanced oxidation technologies and nanotechnologies, physical-chemical processes for water quality control, and environmental applications and implications of nanotechnology. His research interests include advanced technologies for water treatment, advanced oxidation technologies, transition metal-based chemical oxidation, and nanotechnology. Dr. Dionysiou is the author or co-author of over 90 refereed journal publications, 80 conference proceedings, 8 book chapter publications, and more than 300 presentations. He has received funding from NSF, U.S. EPA, NASA, NOAA/CICEET, USGS, and DuPont. He currently serves as editor or associate editor for four journals and he is the recipient of several awards including: the Excellence in Review Award, Environmental Science and Technology (American Chemical Society) (2008), the AEESP Dissertation Advisor Award (2008), the NSF CAREER Award (2005); the DuPont Young Professor Award (2005); the 2007 Sigma Xi Award for Young Faculty, University of Cincinnati Chapter; the 2006 College of Engineering Research Award for Young Faculty, and the 2009 and 2010 College of Engineering Distinguished Engineering Researcher Award.

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Ian Papautsky University of Cincinnati

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Ian Papautsky is an Associate Professor in the School of Electronics and Computing Systems at the University of Cincinnati. He received a Ph.D. in bioengineering from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT. His research interests focus on developing disposable polymer microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) systems for point-of-care (POC) applications and bio/chemical sensors for in situ sensing and analysis.

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Miguel Pelaez University of Cincinnati

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Miguel Pelaez is a Ph.D. student in the Environmental Engineering Program at UC. His research interests are related to environmental engineering and science with specific focus on water quality using nanotechnology. He works with solar-driven technologies for the degradation of emerging environmental pollutants of concern. He has been honored with several scholarships and awards such as the 2009 Richard C. Wigger Scholarship (UC) and the 2010 Graduate Student Award in Environmental Chemistry from the American Chemical Society. He is author and co-author in eight peer-reviewed journals including Applied Catalysis B and Environmental Science & Technology.

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Mark Schulz

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Christopher Huth

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Vesselin N. Shanov University of Cincinnati

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Vesselin N. Shanov is Professor at the School of Energy, Environmental, Biological and Medical Engineering at the University of Cincinnati. He has international academic and industrial experience in development of facilities and technologies for processing of nanostructured materials and thin films. Dr. Shanov has received several prestigious awards, among them the Fulbright Award for Research and Teaching in USA and the German Academic Foundation (DAAD) Award. His current research is focused on synthesis, processing, characterization, and application of nanostructured materials with emphasis on carbon nanotubes. He is co-director of the UC Nanoworld Laboratories. Dr. Shanov has more than 220 scientific publications, including 14 patents and 4 books. He received his M.S. in Electronic Materials from the University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Sofia, Bulgaria. Dr. Shanov completed his Ph.D. in Solid State Chemistry at the University of Regensburg, Germany, and at the University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Sofia, Bulgaria.

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Donglu Shi University of Cincinnati

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Donglu Shi received his Ph.D in 1986 from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He was a Staff Scientist at the Materials Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory for eight years before he joined the faculty in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Cincinnati in 1995. Donglu Shi has so far published 200 refereed journal publications including Physical Review Letters, Nature, and Advanced Materials, with an h-index of 32. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Nano LIFE, and Associate Editor of Materials Science & Engineering: C, and J. of Nanomaterials. Donglu Shi’s main interests include nanostructured materials, nano biomedicine, and superconductors.

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Abstract

This paper will discuss six experimental modules that were developed to provide hands-on experience for undergraduate students interested in nanoscale science and technology in theCollege of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS) and the College of Arts and Sciences(A&S) at the University of Cincinnati. The six modules were integrated into two new courses(three modules for each course) entitled Nanoscale Devices and Environmental Aspects ofNanotechnology that were developed as part of an NUE grant to enhance undergraduateeducation in nanotechnology and engineering at UC. Nanoscale Devices addresses importantcontemporary issues including design, construction, and emerging applications of nanoscaledevices, while Environmental Aspects of Nanotechnology discusses environmental applicationsof nanotechnology as well as the environmental impact of nanotechnology. The new coursesbuild on the background that students have gained in existing courses entitled Introduction toNanoscale Science and Technology and Experimental Nanoscale Science and Technology toprovide students at UC with outstanding education in nanoscale science and engineering. Allfour courses are offered yearly; they will form the basis for a minor focused on interdisciplinarynanoscale science and technology that will be developed subsequently, and are cross-listed byCEAS and A&S, making them readily available to students in many different disciplines.Modules developed for the course Nanoscale Devices are entitled Synthesis of Nanoparticles asSensor Building Blocks, Making Wireless Biosensors Using a Nanomanipulator, andElectrochemical Sensors in Fluidic Channels. Modules developed for Environmental Aspects ofNanotechnology are entitled Magnetic Separation of Toxins by Applied Fields, MagneticMeasurement of Nanoparticles, and Active Nanosystems for the Destruction of Toxins in Water.Details of the modules as well as results obtained during the first presentation of the modulesduring the autumn and winter quarters of 2010-2011 will be discussed. As part of an outreach program, the six experimental modules were adapted forpresentation to students in the Summer Institute (SI) conducted by CEAS. SI is a five-weekprogram designed to increase the awareness and interest of underrepresented ethnic students inSTEM fields. The program targets students from high schools and junior high schoolsthroughout the greater Cincinnati area. Results obtained from presentation of the modules in SIduring the summer of 2010, including extensive feedback from students, will also be discussed.

Boerio, J., & Dionysiou, D. D., & Papautsky, I., & Pelaez, M., & Schulz, M., & Huth, C., & Shanov, V. N., & Shi, D. (2011, June), Nanotechnology in Undergraduate Education: Development of Experimental Modules Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. https://peer.asee.org/18973

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