Asee peer logo

National Hydrogen And Fuel Cell Education Program Part I: Curriculum

Download Paper |

Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Curricular Developments in Energy Education

Tagged Division

Energy Conversion and Conservation

Page Count

21

Page Numbers

15.907.1 - 15.907.21

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/16037

Download Count

121

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

David Blekhman California State University Los Angeles

biography

Jason Keith Michigan Technological University

visit author page

Jason Keith is an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Michigan Technological University. He received his B.S.ChE from the University of Akron in 1995, and his Ph.D from the University of Notre Dame in 2001. His current research interests include reactor stability, alternative energy, and engineering education. He is the 2008 recipient of the Raymond W. Fahien Award for Outstanding Teaching Effectiveness and Educational Scholarship. He has served ASEE as program chair and awards co-chair of the Chemical Engineering Division.

visit author page

biography

Ahmad Sleiti University of Central Florida

visit author page

Ahmad Sleiti is an Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering Technology and Mechanical Engineering Departments at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC) and a member of Energy Production and Infrastructure Center (EPIC). He obtained his PhD from the University of Central Florida (UCF), USA. He also holds two MS degrees in mechanical engineering. He has taught at UCF, UNCC and at University of Jordan (UJ). Prior to coming to UNCC, he was an Assistant Professor and Research Associate at UCF. He also worked for several years as a mechanical engineer in various consulting, R&D and contracting firms on industrial, commercial and residential projects. His research interests include energy systems, fuel cells, thermal management and thermal transport phenomena, nanofluids, heat transfer and aerodynamics for gas turbines and other turbomachinery.

visit author page

biography

Eileen Cashman Humboldt State University

visit author page

Eileen Cashman is a professor of Environmental Resources Engineering at Humboldt State University and a Faculty Research Associate at SERC. She is an alumna of HSU where she received her B.S. degree in Environmental Resources Engineering. She received an M.S. in Energy Policy and Analysis and a Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Cashman currently teaches courses in engineering design, water quality, computational methods and environmental fluid hydraulics. At SERC, Cashman is currently involved in a feasibility study for hydroelectric resources for the Yurok tribe and the H2E3 university curriculum project.

visit author page

author page

Peter Lehman Humboldt State University

biography

Richard Engel Schatz Energy Research Center

visit author page

Richard Engel is a Senior Research Engineer at SERC. He graduated from Humboldt State University with a B.S. in Environmental Resources Engineering. Engel's work at SERC has included technical, development of educational materials for high school and university level students, hydrogen and fuel cell system maintenance and repair, energy program development for local communities and Tribes, and feasibility research on emerging energy technologies. Engel is currently a Fulbright Scholar at Universidad Don Bosco in El Salvador during the 2009-2010 academic year where he will help the university create a degree program in renewable energy and energy efficiency.

visit author page

author page

Michael Mann University of North Dakota

author page

Hossein Salehfar University of North Dakota

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Education Program Part I: Curriculum

Abstract

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) made five awards to university programs seeking to develop and expand education programs in Hydrogen and Fuel Cells. The main objective of the DOE program was to train graduates who will "comprise the next generation workforce needed for research, development, and demonstration activities in government, industry, and academia."

Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies (HFCT) are considered strong components in the future suite of technologies enabling energy independence and a cleaner environment for stationary and transportation applications. However, HFCT are inherently complex and require contribution from most of the engineering and technology disciplines. At the same time, HFCT topics are rare in university programs and few engineering students receive adequate training.

The paper will present the educational efforts and models being developed under this funding. The program is offered through California State University Los Angeles, Humboldt State University, Michigan Technological University, University of North Carolina Charlotte and University of North Dakota. With collaborations, the list of participating colleges is even larger. The authors' intent is to share the wealth of approaches taken to and the challenges and accomplishments of developing HFCT curriculum, which range from designing short modules for existing courses to dedicating majors and minors to the topic. More than twenty courses are modified or developed as part of the activities. As a result, HFCT is introduced to technology and chemical, mechanical, electrical, and environmental engineering majors. The activities undertaken also include outreach to non-major student population and school programs.

Introduction

In fall 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) made five awards to university programs seeking to develop and expand Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education. The original solicitation sought to expand hydrogen and fuel cell technology awareness among the general public, decision makers and also develop professional educational programs. Five academic institutions throughout the country were selected to further expand the latter. The main objective of this section of the program was to train graduates who will "comprise the next generation workforce needed for research, development, and demonstration activities in government, industry, and academia."1 The program is offered through awards to California State University Los Angeles, Humboldt State University, Michigan Technological University, University of North Carolina Charlotte and the University of North Dakota.

The first year of executing the educational program has overlapped with interesting developments in the government and industry. The 2010 FY DOE budget proposal significantly reduced the funding for the DOE’s hydrogen programs following Secretary Chu’s skepticism in the readiness of HFCTs to reach the mass market in the near future. The DOE website2 cites “Dr. Steven Chu, distinguished scientist and co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics (1997), was

Blekhman, D., & Keith, J., & Sleiti, A., & Cashman, E., & Lehman, P., & Engel, R., & Mann, M., & Salehfar, H. (2010, June), National Hydrogen And Fuel Cell Education Program Part I: Curriculum Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/16037

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2010 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015