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New Faculty, Undergraduates, And Industry Contracts: Observations And Lessons Learned From Engineering Professors

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Best of the NEE

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

12.1102.1 - 12.1102.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1823

Download Count

23

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Paper Authors

biography

James Squire Virginia Military Institute

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Dr. James Squire is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Virginia Military Institute. He received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the United States Military Academy in West Point, NY and served in the army as a Military Intelligence officer during Desert Storm. Although his PhD is in electrical engineering, he completed his doctoral work in a biomedical engineering laboratory at MIT and has interests in analog and digital instrumentation, signal processing, biomechanics, patent litigation, and cardiology. At VMI he teaches analog circuitry, continuous time and discrete time signal processing, and advises a variety of independent study projects.

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Charles Bott Virginia Military Institute

biography

Matthew Hyre Virginia Military Institute

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Dr. Matt Hyre is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the Virginia Military Institute. He received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. He completed his Ph.D. work at MIT in the areas of computational modeling and multiphase flows. He has over 10 years industrial experience in the modeling of environmental technologies and manufacturing processes. His current interests include numerical analysis, virtual reality modeling for industrial processes, monte carlo methods in numerical radiation modeling, computational modeling of viscoelastic materials, and biological thermofluids. At VMI he teaches energy conversion, computational modeling and virtual design, biothermal fluid mechanics, aerodyanmics, and advises a variety of independent study projects.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

New Faculty, Undergraduates, and Industry Contracts: Observations and Lessons Learned from Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering Professors

Abstract

Most new faculty have little experience managing contracts, and most have minimal experience advising undergraduates conducting research. Combining these two roles leads to both synergistic and antagonistic opportunities/challenges often not obvious at the outset. In this paper, relatively new (3-6 years) authors from civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering departments describe their observations on this topic based upon over 30 different contracts, specifically: • 3 types of research contracts, and the benefits and difficulties with each. • 6 tips for success in choosing and writing suitable contracts • 3 tips for success in choosing suitable students • 3 tips for success in conducting projects • examples and analysis of projects that went well • examples and analysis of projects that went poorly • things the authors wish they had known in their first year

As an example, using both specific examples and inductive generalizations, the suitability of federally-funded and industry (including traditional industry, consulting firms and municipalities)-funded contract sources are analyzed. Each of these funding sources is evaluated for undergraduate research suitability with respect to typical timelines, funding agency’s criticality of success, the undergraduate’s class year, and the professor’s time before tenure review.

I. Introduction

Ph.D. granting universities have long expected their faculty to conduct an active research program, however in the past two decades an increasing emphasis has been reported in the amount of emphasis undergraduate-only engineering schools are placing on their faculty to build research programs.1 While some studies have questioned whether this has a negative impact upon the teaching experience, especially of technical subjects2,3,4, it will likely continue to increase as administrators seek to improve faculty productivity and university income5, and states enact measures to encourage this.6 The past two decades have also seen a concomitant increase in the desire from university administration through federal granting agencies for engineering faculty members to develop active learning strategies to teach undergraduates, a practice recommended by numerous recent studies. 7,8,9.

Given a limited amount of time and pressure to actively involve undergraduates and conduct research, it is commonly assumed that new faculty intuitively understand the need to combine the teaching and research domains. While that is true, it is not obvious how do this effectively, and this paper conveys the best practices learned by three faculty members representing

Squire, J., & Bott, C., & Hyre, M. (2007, June), New Faculty, Undergraduates, And Industry Contracts: Observations And Lessons Learned From Engineering Professors Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/1823

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2007 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015