Asee peer logo

On The Initiation And Development Of An Advanced Manufacturing Educational Program To Aid Displaced Workers

Download Paper |

Conference

1998 Annual Conference

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 28, 1998

Start Date

June 28, 1998

End Date

July 1, 1998

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

3.431.1 - 3.431.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7322

Download Count

47

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

Rona Colosimo Warner

author page

Paul J. Warner

author page

Kim LaScola Needy

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2642

On the Initiation and Development of an Advanced Manufacturing Educational Program to Aid Displaced Workers

Paul J. Warner, Rona Colosimo Warner, Kim LaScola Needy University of Pittsburgh, Department of Industrial Engineering

Abstract

This paper presents a model based on classic project management and systems analysis that was created and utilized by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Industrial Engineering Manufacturing Assistance Center (MAC) to develop an accelerated manufacturing training program for displaced workers. The following details the motivation for this initiative, how the curriculum was developed, and the design and implementation tasks. Results of two sessions, including a follow-up on subsequent job placement, are presented. The paper concludes with a discussion of future enhancements to the program and suggestions for extending the model into other types of training.

1. Introduction Renowned management consultant and author, Peter Drucker[4] reported that the cost of higher education has risen as fast as the cost of health care, without any visible improvement in either the content or the quality of education. Thus, the U.S. educational system is being challenged to provide increased educational opportunities without the usual increases in budgets. When institutions of higher learning listen to the customer, i.e., the student, to help direct new strategic initiatives in this area, perhaps the most startling observation that they will make is a marked change in the customer. Traditional college students (age 18-22 and full-time) are slowly being outnumbered by nontraditional college students. Tucker[9] reports that today 40-50% of college students are busy adults, i.e., they are older, wish to attend school part-time, and have limited time due to work and family responsibilities. Schools that have recognized this trend have had success when implementing initiatives such as degree completion programs and continuing education courses aimed at this growing population of nontraditional students.[6]

The University of Pittsburgh’s Manufacturing Assistance Center (MAC) developed and conducted an eight-week 300-hour advanced manufacturing technology educational program aimed at training a focused segment of these nontraditional students - displaced workers - with the skills necessary for an entry level machining position. This paper will describe the motivation for this initiative, how the curriculum was developed based on a regional survey and benchmarking analysis, and how the final course was designed and implemented. Since its development, two sessions with six students each have been conducted. Results of these sessions, including a follow-up on subsequent job placement, will be described. The paper will conclude with a discussion of future enhancements to the program and suggestions for extending the model into other types of training.

Warner, R. C., & Warner, P. J., & Needy, K. L. (1998, June), On The Initiation And Development Of An Advanced Manufacturing Educational Program To Aid Displaced Workers Paper presented at 1998 Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington. https://peer.asee.org/7322

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 1998 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015