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Online Sharing Platform for Course Modules: Understanding Materials Use and Effectiveness

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Multidisciplinary Learning and Teaching Experiences

Tagged Division

Multidisciplinary Engineering

Page Count

34

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/37540

Download Count

6

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Paper Authors

biography

Haolin Zhu Arizona State University

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Dr. Haolin Zhu earned her BEng in Engineering Mechanics from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and her Ph.D. in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics from Cornell University, with a focus on computational solid mechanics. Dr. Zhu is a Senior Lecturer of the freshman engineering education team in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University (ASU) and the recipient of the Fulton Outstanding Lecturer Award. In this role, she focuses on designing the curriculum and teaching in the freshman engineering program and the mechanical engineering program. She is also the Assistant Director of the NAE Grand Challenges Scholars Program (GCSP) at ASU and works closely with the Director to ensure the success of the program. Dr. Zhu is also involved in the ASU ProMod project, the Engineering Projects in Community Service program, the Engineering Futures program, the Global Freshman Academy/Earned Admission Program, and the ASU Kern Project. She was a part of the team that designed a largely team and activity based online Introduction to Engineering course. She has also co-developed two unique MOOCs, Introduction to Engineering and Perspectives on Grand Challenges for Engineering for the Global Freshman Academy/ASU Earned Admission Program. Her Ph.D. research focuses on multi-scale multiphase modeling and numerical analysis of coupled large viscoelastic deformation and fluid transport in swelling porous materials, but she is currently interested in various topics in the field of engineering education, such as innovative teaching pedagogies for increased retention and student motivation; innovations in non-traditional delivery methods, incorporation of the Entrepreneurial Mindset in the engineering curriculum and its impact.

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Amy Trowbridge Arizona State University

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Amy Trowbridge is a Senior Lecturer in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University and is the Director of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Grand Challenges Scholars Program (GCSP) at ASU. Through the GCSP, Amy aims to prepare students to become globally and socially aware engineers who will lead future efforts to solve the world’s biggest challenges. Amy also helps new schools to develop GCSPs as part of the GCSP Network New Programs committee. She is also actively involved in the Kern Entrepreneurial Engineering Network (KEEN), focused on students’ development of entrepreneurial mindset through GCSP and curriculum. Amy received the 2019 KEEN Rising Star award for her efforts in encouraging students to develop an entrepreneurial mindset. Amy has contributed to the development of a new hands-on multidisciplinary introduction to engineering course, a unique introduction to engineering MOOC, and another MOOC focused on exploring global challenges from an interdisciplinary perspective. She is interested in curricular and co-curricular experiences that broaden students’ perspectives and enhance student learning, and values students' use of Digital Portfolios to reflect on and showcase their accomplishments. Amy earned her Master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering from Arizona State University (ASU), and is currently pursuing her PhD in Engineering Education Systems and Design.

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Keirien Taylor Arizona State University, UOEEE

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Keirien Taylor is a research assistant at Arizona State University's Office of Evaluations and Educational Effectiveness.

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Daniel J. Laxman Arizona State University

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Building on existing research, I use advanced statistical analyses and research methods to answer questions regarding parenting, family relations, disabilities, and other topics. I also use these skills to evaluate the effectiveness of programs. I use R and other statistical software for my analyses and reports. I am continually expanding my skill set in statistics and data science to best answer research questions.

Leaders in science, policy, and business committed to evidenced-based decision-making embrace the refrain, "Data or it didn't happen." I have adopted this refrain as a guiding principle in my life and work. I use data to make sound decisions and draw conclusions that do not extrapolate beyond the data. When hard data are not available, I wait to make a decision, when possible, or critically evaluate what is known before making a decision.

My extensive training and experience have focused on obtaining and analyzing data. As a firm believer that days of statistical analyses cannot make-up for a missed hour of project design, I value the design process of generating good data. Indeed, some have suggested a revised refrain "Good data or it didn't happen." Good data are data that answer the right question. Part of the design process involves updating measures and methods to answer the question and, in many cases, revising the question to address what we really want to know.

I have invested and continue to invest significant time and effort into developing quantitative and qualitative analytic skills. I do this because it allows me to select the methods that best answer a research question. It also allows me to balance methodological rigor and practical constraints, but still obtain the most correct answer possible. My approach to data analysis is (paraphrasing Einstein) that data analysis should be as simple as possible, but not simpler.

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Abstract

Online Sharing Platform for Course Modules: Understanding Materials Use and Effectiveness

This paper describes the use and effectiveness of open access course modules shared with faculty from multiple institutions on an online platform. The course modules are centered around the National Academy of Engineering’s (NAE) Grand Challenges for Engineering and focus on the development of an interdisciplinary systems perspective of global challenges related to the themes of sustainability, health, security, and joy of living. These course modules were inspired by a course that was developed and offered to students in the NAE Grand Challenges Scholars Program (GCSP) at [Institution] and also used in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) developed and offered through [Institution]’s [Program Name]. Many different types of materials have been developed for these course modules including expert talks, instructor-led videos, application videos that feature voice-over animations and images, case studies, discussions, role play based simulations and games, design activities, mind mapping activities, a debate, a professional digital portfolio, a research assignment and a project. Multiple variations of these materials were shared on the platform such that they can be implemented in different learning modalities including synchronous online, asynchronous online, and in person. To share these course modules with faculty members in and outside of GCSP from other institutions, an online platform was developed and launched in spring 2020. To date, these course modules have been accessed by 82 users from institutions and organizations across the nation and internationally. Two survey instruments were administered to understand the motivations behind users’ interest in and use of the course modules, how they are using and/or planning to use the course modules, and the effectiveness of the course modules and the online platform. The first survey was administered when the users first accessed the course and it collects information about the users and their motivations. The second survey was administered in fall 2020 to two groups of users to gain more information about their motivations, their use of the course modules, and the impact and effectiveness of the course modules. The first group includes users who registered to access the course modules but did not access anything beyond the introductory module and did not complete the first survey, and the second group includes users who registered, accessed course modules beyond the introductory module, completed the first survey, and gave permission to be contacted for a follow-up survey. Follow up interviews were also conducted with randomly selected users to better understand how well the course modules have worked for them, their challenges and successes with the use of the course modules, and the usability of the online platform. In this paper, the development of the online platform will be described and insights gained from the surveys and interviews will be shared and discussed.

Zhu, H., & Trowbridge, A., & Taylor, K., & Laxman, D. J. (2021, July), Online Sharing Platform for Course Modules: Understanding Materials Use and Effectiveness Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/37540

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