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Panel Session: Targeted Harassment in Engineering Education: What It Looks Like, Why Now, and What Is at Stake

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Targeted Harassment in Engineering Education: What It Looks Like, Why Now, and What Is at Stake

Tagged Division

Liberal Education/Engineering & Society

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--33154

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/33154

Download Count

115

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Paper Authors

biography

Alice L Pawley Purdue University-Main Campus, West Lafayette (College of Engineering) Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-9117-4855

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Alice L. Pawley is an Associate Professor in the School of Engineering Education and an affiliate faculty member in the Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies Program and the Division of Environmental and Ecological Engineering at Purdue University. Prof. Pawley's goal through her work at Purdue is to help people, including the engineering education profession, develop a vision of engineering education as more inclusive, engaged, and socially just. She runs the Feminist Research in Engineering Education Group whose diverse projects and group members are described at pawleyresearch.org. She received a CAREER award in 2010 and a PECASE award in 2012 for her project researching the stories of undergraduate engineering women and men of color and white women. She has received ASEE-ERM’s best paper award for her CAREER research, and the Denice Denton Emerging Leader award from the Anita Borg Institute, both in 2013. She was co-PI of Purdue’s ADVANCE program from 2008-2014, focusing on the underrepresentation of women in STEM faculty positions. She helped found, fund, and grow the PEER Collaborative, a peer mentoring group of early career and recently tenured faculty and research staff primarily evaluated based on their engineering education research productivity. She can be contacted by email at apawley@purdue.edu.

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Erin A. Cech University of Michigan

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Erin Cech joined the department of sociology at the University of Michigan as an assistant professor in 2016. Prior to that she was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University and was on faculty at Rice University. She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, San Diego. Cech’s research seeks to uncover seemingly benign cultural mechanisms of inequality reproduction—particularly around cultural logics in popular explanations of inequality; gender, sexual identity and racial/ethnic inequality in science and engineering; and cultural definitions of “good work” and “good workers.”

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Donna M Riley Purdue University-Main Campus, West Lafayette (College of Engineering)

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Donna Riley is Kamyar Haghighi Head of the School of Engineering Education and Professor of Engineering Education at Purdue University.

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Stephanie Farrell Rowan University

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Dr. Stephanie Farrell is Professor and Founding Chair of Experiential Engineering Education at Rowan University (USA). Prior to 2016 she was a faculty member in Chemical Engineering at Rowan for eighteen years. Dr. Farrell has contributed to engineering education through her work in inductive pedagogy, spatial skills, and inclusion and diversity. She has been honored by the American Society of Engineering Education with several teaching awards such as the 2004 National Outstanding Teaching Medal and the 2005 Quinn Award for experiential learning, and she was 2014-15 Fulbright Scholar in Engineering Education at Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland)tephanie Farrell is Professor and Founding Chair of Experiential Engineering Education at Rowan University (USA) and was 2014-15 Fulbright Scholar in Engineering Education at Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland).

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Abstract

The marginalization of critical perspectives that has plagued continental philosophers, heterodox economists, women’s and ethnic studies scholars for decades is now affecting STEM diversity scholars, and engineering education equity scholars in particular. There is a reported rise nationwide in the targeted harassment of academics for their scholarship. We now have multiple cases in engineering education to consider. What are the stakes of this phenomenon and our institutions’ responses? Several engineering education scholars who have been targeted will serve on a panel in this session to talk about the disciplinarity of this increase, its form and tone, ways institutions can better support the work of these scholars, and how scholars can bolster one another.

Pawley, A. L., & Cech, E. A., & Riley, D. M., & Farrell, S. (2019, June), Panel Session: Targeted Harassment in Engineering Education: What It Looks Like, Why Now, and What Is at Stake Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--33154

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015