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Peer-based Gamification Products Critiquing: Two Case studies in Engineering Education

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Computing Technology Session 1

Tagged Division

Computers in Education

Page Count

13

DOI

10.18260/1-2--28735

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/28735

Download Count

249

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Paper Authors

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Jingwen(Jess) Li PSU

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Jingwen Li is a current PhD candidate in Human Factors at IE department, Penn State University. She graduated from Beihang University, Beijing, with her thesis working on upper limb dynamic modeling applied in extravehicular activities considering spacesuit effects. Her research focus now includes modeling cognitive aspects of human in a dynamic information system, maintaining vigilance through physical activity in during monitoring task, and applying gamification to enhance engineering education.

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EUNSIK KIM Pennsylvania State University

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Eunsik graduated in 2008 from the Dog-A University with B.S. in Industrial Engineering. He received double M.S. in Industrial Engineering at Dong-A University and University at Buffalo working with several manufacturing companies such as Hyundai Rotem and General Motors Korea. He is currently a doctoral student in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, under the co-advisement of Dr. Freivalds and Dr. Rothrock.

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Alec M Schultis Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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Bachelor's Degree in Industrial Engineering at Pennsylvania State University .

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Andrew Joseph Kapfer The Pennsylvania State University

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Industrial Engineering Undergrad at The Pennsylvania State University

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Jimmy Lin Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University.

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Peter A Yake

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Domenic M Erjavec

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Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering from Pennsylvania State University.

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Benjamin Dabat

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Ling Rothrock Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Ling Rothrock received the Ph.D. degrees in industrial engineering from Georgia Tech. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University in University Park, PA. He has published over 80 research articles. His research interests include human-in-the-loop simulations, behavioral decision making, and human-machine performance assessment.

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Abstract

Gamification has been emerging as a pedagogical tool over the past few years, and numerous studies report positive outcomes from games applied in educational environments. However, researchers rarely discuss the gamification development process. Little work has been done to analyze their gamification in terms of usability, game elements, etc.. In addition, in most previous studies, students are the end user, and only get involved in the final test to provide data on motivation, engagement or learning outcomes. Under the circumstances, the following questions are left unaddressed: how to evaluate the effectiveness of a gamification product in education? What do students learn when they create and critique gamification products? This paper proposes a peer-based gamification critique process based on peer-developed game products. We expect such a process will provide valuable feedback from an end-user perspective and that the outcomes will help to answer the above questions. This present study is an extension of a previous research cycle in which end users (students) developed gamification products to help students learn challenging concepts in industrial engineering courses. We selected four final gamification products for further evaluation: “Avengers”, “Bake-off-453”, “Gulf games” and “DungeoNIOSH”. These games are intended to teach the concepts of: “Discrete probability distributions”, “Gulf of evaluation vs. Gulf of execution”, “Interaction effects” and “NIOSH Lifting equation”. The first two are basic concepts in statistics, and the last two relate to the human factor/ergonomics domain. In this study, we had two student teams conduct a critique of these gamification products as their Capstone project. Peer-based critiques consist of three main steps after matching the teams with their interested game products: firstly, critiquing the gamification product from a game perspective, including metrics like what types of game elements are included, interactivity, motivation, engagement level, et al. secondly, evaluating the gamification products on aspects of education and focusing on the learning effectiveness; finally, critiquing gamification products based on usability guidelines and principles. Student teams were instructed to specify each criterion and cover all three aspects. At the end of this paper, two case studies are presented, showing the final critique criteria developed by student teams. Most importantly, we will collect valuable insights from end users, i.e., what they can learn from the critiquing process, what lessons we can learn from their feedback. These will provide us with meaningful information to help evaluate gamification products designed to enhance engineering concept learning.

Li, J., & KIM, E., & Schultis, A. M., & Kapfer, A. J., & Lin, J., & Yake, P. A., & Erjavec, D. M., & Dabat, B., & Rothrock, L. (2017, June), Peer-based Gamification Products Critiquing: Two Case studies in Engineering Education Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. 10.18260/1-2--28735

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