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Please, No Powerpoint! Teaching Strategies That Work And Those That Do Not In Engineering Education

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Engineering Educators: Tricks of the Trade II

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Page Count

21

Page Numbers

12.1159.1 - 12.1159.21

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3046

Download Count

32

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Paper Authors

biography

Karen Benitez University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez

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Karen Benitez is a honor 4th year Industrial Engineering student at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez and is part of a group of undergrads that participates in opportunities for research at the IE department.

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Juan Jimenez University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez

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Juan Jimenez is a 3rd year IE student being funded by the Puerto Rico Alliance for Minority Participation PR_LSAMP to work at the International Service Systems Research Lab. Juan is Vice-president of the INFORMS student chapter at the UPRM and a member of the Institute of Industrial Engineers

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Yesenia Cruz University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez

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Yesenia Cruz is a graduate student working at the International Service Systems Research Lab in issues of complex systems for disaster relief. She is president of the Student chapter of INFORMS at the UPRM.

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Marta Rosa University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez

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Marta Rosa is a 4th year Industrial Engineering student at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez and is part of a group of undergrads that participates in opportunities for research at the IE department. Marta is a member of IIE.

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Alexandra Medina-Borja University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez

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Dr. Alexandra Medina-Borja is an assistant professor at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez and Director of the International Service Systems Engineering Lab. Alexandra holds a Masters and Ph.D. degrees in Industrial and Systems Engineering, both from Virginia Tech, and a BS in Production of Materials Engineering from the Federal University of Sao Carlos, in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Her research interests are systems thinking, systems dynamics, service operations, economic design issues, performance measurement using DEA, evaluating success factors in engineering and the cognitive processes that occur during their acquisition.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Please, No PowerPoint! Teaching strategies that work, those that do not and the case for and against slide presentations in engineering education.

ABSTRACT

Much has been said about retention of engineering students in the 21 century. Among the many studies attempting to identify successful teaching techniques and methods for STEM disciplines, few conceptualize success as understanding the subject, getting reasonable good grades but also as remembering key concepts in the future. There are even fewer studies that have asked students directly questions such as what teaching strategies have impacted them the most? Which professors have been successful making the subject clear and understandable to them and why? What did they do? As well as what would they recommend instructors to avoid?

We discuss the results of a comprehensive focus group study being undertaken at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez among Industrial Engineering freshmen to the fifth year students. We asked students what they remember about professors that they feel taught them the most, and also of those that did not contribute much to their “engineering education.” Among the findings, a prevalence of rejection towards the use of Power Point presentations was revealed.

Other findings and conclusions for future research are also discussed surrounding student- centrism vs. teacher-centrism.

1 INTRODUCTION

Much has been said about retention of engineering students in the 21 century. The role of the instructor and the instructional method has also been discussed extensively. Old theories of what people thought to be the best learning techniques are basically still valid, even though they are subject to be modified by more recent teaching developments. Newer theories do not always suggest alternatives or replacements; these may address a different hierarchical level1. However an evaluation of what a good teacher or instructor is has rarely been obtained from the most appropriate source (the student) on an open ended fashion.

The truth is that throughout their academic life, students pass through many teachers and live different experiences with them. Beyond human interaction, their passage is in fact one throughout different teaching styles and instructional strategies. Hence, evaluating a professor is more than providing a personal assessment of his/her teaching skills since each student has a different point of view of what is or is not a good teacher. But all these skills and features converge to the same point: a good instructor is one who has the best teaching strategies to transmit knowledge.

Benitez, K., & Jimenez, J., & Cruz, Y., & Rosa, M., & Medina-Borja, A. (2007, June), Please, No Powerpoint! Teaching Strategies That Work And Those That Do Not In Engineering Education Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/3046

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2007 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015