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Preparing And Advising A Fast Track Education In Robotics

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Innovations in ECE Education I

Tagged Division

Electrical and Computer

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

12.1174.1 - 12.1174.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2686

Download Count

24

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Paper Authors

biography

David Chang USMA

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Major David J. Chang is an Assistant Professor at the US Military Academy, West Point, NY. His recent research has been on Coordinated & Sensing Robotics, Distributed & Autonomous Control Systems, and Network Vulnerability & Flexibility. Chang received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Drexel University and an M.S.E. and Ph.D. in Electrical and Systems Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Contact him at david.chang@usma.edu

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biography

Grant Jacoby USMA

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Lieutenant Colonel Grant A. Jacoby is a Senior Research Scientist and Assistant Professor at the US Military Academy, West Point, NY. His research interests include wireless security, net-centric operations, knowledge management and robotic communications. Jacoby is a senior member of IEEE and has three MS degrees, a Ph.D. in Software Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Virginia Tech. Contact him at grant.jacocby@usma.edu

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Lisa Shay U.S. Military Academy

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LISA A. SHAY is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the US Military Academy at West Point. She received the M.Sc. in Engineering from Cambridge University as a Marshall Scholar in 1996, the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2002 and is a Member of ASEE and a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

PREPARING AND ADVISING A FAST-TRACK EDUCATION IN ROBOTICS

Abstract

As the practicality of using robotics continues to rise, so do students’ (and educators’) aspirations to learn and apply them in a variety of ways. This paper outlines a successful approach to marry the interests of a commercial client and undergraduate education in robotics as well as how to establish a vision and supporting curriculum for a robotics program that engages students in meaningful challenges that sustain enthusiasm and helps meet expectations of all sides.

Introduction: Reinvigorate Robotics

Robotic science and systems is a very fast growing area of research and it has significant potential for various applications to include military, security, commercial, scientific (space exploration), academic, social, humanitarian, medical, etc. The primary focus of this paper is on military, security, and academic applications, with an emphasis on using robotics as a teaching tool and to develop pedagogical methodology.

Congress has set a goal for the Armed Forces to achieve the fielding of unmanned, remotely controlled technology such that: One, by 2010, one-third of the operational deep strike aircraft of the Armed Forces are unmanned; and Two, by 2015, one-third of the operational ground combat vehicles of the Armed Forces are unmanned 1. In support of this, the vision of the United States Military Academy (USMA) is studying and developing cooperative robotics systems that work together autonomously to carry, employ, deploy or retrieve sensor for a variety of purposes. Examples include improvised explosive device (IED) detection and eradication as well as the emplacement and retrieval of surveillance sensors and networks.

The main tactical advantages of using unmanned systems to find carry, employ, deploy, or retrieve sensors are that robotic systems can take point during convoys, travel in hazardous environments, maneuver in relatively small areas, be utilized in hostile situations, be used as a decoy or be sent to draw out opponent fires or explosives without risking the life of the operator.

There are various research and development interests in academia and industry that focus on the capabilities and potential of robotic systems. However, single unmanned systems provide no redundancy for a single point of failure if only one unmanned system is deployed to perform a mission. Concentrating all payloads or sensors into one system also provides no flexibility. Hence, we are conducting research of cooperative robotic platforms where payloads, sensors and tasks are divided into various specialized modular platforms. These platforms then can be assembled as a team, custom tailored for the various mission requirements.

As the practicality of using robotics in this manner and many others continues to rise, so do students’ (and educators’) aspirations to learn and apply them in a variety of ways. This paper outlines a successful approach to readily marry the interests of a commercial client and undergraduate education in robotics as well as how to establish a vision and supporting

Chang, D., & Jacoby, G., & Shay, L. (2007, June), Preparing And Advising A Fast Track Education In Robotics Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2686

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