Asee peer logo

Preparing For Participation In Speed: An Asee Initiative For A Nationally Recognized Development Program For Engineering Educators

Download Paper |

Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Faculty Development for Distance Learning

Tagged Division

Continuing Professional Development

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

15.975.1 - 15.975.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/16805

Download Count

13

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Donald Visco Tennessee Technological University

visit author page

Dr. Don Visco is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Tennessee Technological University, where he has been employed since 1999. Prior to that, he graduated with his Ph.D from the University at Buffalo, SUNY. His current research interests include experimental and computational thermodynamics as well as bioinformatics/drug design. He is an active and contributing member of ASEE at the local, regional and national level. He is the 2006 recipient of the Raymond W. Fahien Award for Outstanding Teaching Effectiveness and Educational Scholarship as well as the 2009 recipient of the National Outstanding Teaching Award from ASEE.

visit author page

biography

Dirk Schaefer Georgia Institute of Technology

visit author page

Dr. Schaefer is an Asst. Professor in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Prior to joining Georgia Tech, Dr. Schaefer was a Lecturer in the School of Engineering at Durham University, UK. During his time at Durham, he earned a Postgraduate Certificate in "Teaching and Learning in Higher Education" (PG-Cert). He joined Durham from a Senior Research Associate position at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, where he earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science. He obtained an Advanced Technical College Certificate in Mechanical Engineering and followed this with a Masters degree in Mathematics from the University of Duisburg, Germany. Dr. Schaefer is also a registered professional European Engineer (Eur Ing), a Chartered Engineer (CEng), a Chartered IT-Professional (CITP) and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA) in the UK.

visit author page

biography

Tristan Utschig Georgia Institute of Technology

visit author page

Dr. Tristan T. Utschig is a Senior Academic Professional in the Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning and is Assistant Director for the Scholarship and Assessment of Teaching and Learning at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Formerly, he was Associate Professor of Engineering Physics at Lewis-Clark State College. Dr. Utschig has regularly published and presented work on a variety of topics including assessment instruments and methodologies, using technology in the classroom, faculty development in instructional design, teaching diversity, and peer coaching. Dr. Utschig completed his PhD in Nuclear Engineering at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. His technical expertise involves analysis of thermal systems for fusion reactor designs.

visit author page

author page

J. P. Mohsen University of Louisville

biography

Norman Fortenberry National Academy of Engineering

visit author page

Dr. Norman L. Fortenberry is the founding Director of the Center for the Advancement of Scholarship on Engineering Education at the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Prior to joining NAE in October, 2002, Dr. Fortenberry held managerial positions within the National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR) including Senior Advisor and Division Director. Prior to returning the NSF as Division Director in November, 1996, Dr. Fortenberry served as Executive Director of the GEM Consortium, an NSF Program Director, and as a member of the mechanical engineering faculty at the Florida A&M University/Florida State University College of Engineering in Tallahassee, Florida. Dr. Fortenberry was awarded the S.B., S.M., and Sc.D. degrees (all in mechanical engineering) by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

visit author page

biography

Michael Prince Bucknell University

visit author page

Dr. Michael Prince is a professor in the Department of Chemi- cal Engineering at Bucknell University, where he has been since receiving his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1989. He is the author of several education-related papers for engineering faculty and gives faculty development workshops on active learning. He is currently participating in Project Catalyst, an NSF- funded initiative to help faculty re-envision their role in the learning process.

visit author page

biography

Cynthia Finelli University of Michigan Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-9148-1492

visit author page

Dr. Cynthia Finelli, Ph.D., is Director of the Center for Research and Learning North and associate research scientist in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan. In addition, she actively pursues research in engineering education and assists other faculty in their scholarly projects. She also is past Chair of the Educational Research and Methods Division of American Society of Engineering Education and guest co-editor for a special issue of the International Journal of Engineering Education on applications of engineering education research.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Preparing for Participation in SPEED: An ASEE Initiative for a Nationally Recognized Development Program for Engineering Educators Abstract

Engineering and engineering technology departments have a long history of adapting to changing societal needs so that their graduates will possess relevant skills and knowledge vital to potential employers. In parallel with the changing engineering and engineering technology curriculum, there has also been a long-standing call to strengthen engineering and technology educators’ capabilities and preparation to perform the task of educating students. This latter call, however, had remained virtually unanswered for more than a century. A recent response to this call is SPEED: Strengthening the Performance of Engineering and Engineering Technology Educators across the Disciplines. SPEED is a concept for a formal, nationally recognized continuing education program for engineering and technology educators being developed with the support of the ASEE. In the introductory part of this paper, the authors briefly present an overview of previous work which has led to the development of a vision for SPEED and its conceptual design. This overview includes comments on current professional development opportunities for faculty across the world, and the challenges, opportunities and critical elements that would be associated with a successful professional educational development program. We then offer a set of core competencies areas which would likely be required of faculty who finish such professional development. Finally, we conclude with some specifics about the proposed SPEED program. We offer some details on its current design and describe plans to engage relevant constituencies and create buy-in from the community.

Origins of SPEED and previous work

Engineering and engineering technology (EET) departments have a long history of adapting to changing societal needs so that their graduates will possess relevant skills and knowledge vital to potential employers. In parallel with the changing engineering and engineering technology curriculum, there has also been a long-standing call to strengthen engineering and technology educators’ capabilities and preparation to perform the task of educating students. This latter call, however, had remained virtually unanswered for more than a century. A recent response to this call is SPEED: Strengthening the Performance of Engineering and Engineering Technology Educators across the Disciplines. SPEED is a concept for a formal, nationally recognized continuing education program for engineering and technology educators being developed with the support of the ASEE1. A brief overview of previous work which has led to the development of a vision for SPEED and its conceptual design is presented in the following section.

Professional faculty development and recognition across the world

Around the world, several programs to support professional qualification, development and/or recognition for those teaching in higher education are known2. They vary considerably in scope, administration and reputation. An analysis of existing models reveals the following programmatic elements to guide comparison2: Who is the governing association or body for the professional development program

Visco, D., & Schaefer, D., & Utschig, T., & Mohsen, J. P., & Fortenberry, N., & Prince, M., & Finelli, C. (2010, June), Preparing For Participation In Speed: An Asee Initiative For A Nationally Recognized Development Program For Engineering Educators Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/16805

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2010 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015