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Product Design And Manufacturing Systems (Pams) In Manufacturing Engineering A Lesson In Team Working

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Conference

1997 Annual Conference

Location

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Publication Date

June 15, 1997

Start Date

June 15, 1997

End Date

June 18, 1997

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

2.331.1 - 2.331.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/6745

Download Count

53

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Paper Authors

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P.J. Fisher

author page

N.J. Quick

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S.J. Steiner

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

ASEE 1997 Annual Conference June 15-18, Milwaukee, WI, USA

Session 1263

PRODUCT DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS (PAMS) IN MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING - a lesson in Team Working

S.J. Steiner, N.J. Quick, P.J. Fisher School of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering University of Birmingham, UK

Synopsis PAMS was first introduced into the manufacturing engineering undergraduate degree programmes offered by the School in 1988/9. It is a project-based activity where the students are organised into teams, spanning all three years of the students’ undergraduate studies. The project acts as an integrating theme through a course module entitled “Total Design”, and requires the students to acquire a number of transferable skills. These include information gathering, report writing, presentation skills, time management, project planning, teamwork, and managing meetings. This paper describes the year on year structure of the PAMS project, and the acquisition of the mentioned transferable skills, with particular reference to team working, and the subsequent implications for the students as they enter industry on graduation.

I. Introduction The School of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Birmingham is a large engineering school which operates six undergraduate degree programmes and seven postgraduate taught courses. The innovation described in this paper concerns only the three undergraduate programmes operated by the Manufacturing Division of the School. These are a BEng and BCom 4-year double honours programme in Manufacturing Engineering and Commerce, a 4-year BEng & Com joint honours programme in Manufacturing Engineering and Business Studies and a single honours Manufacturing Engineering programme, which leads to a BEng in 3 years or an MEng in 4 years. The double honours and joint honours programmes are run in conjunction with the Commerce Faculty, which makes a considerable input to the teaching and assessment of these programmes. All undergraduate programmes operate under a modular structure.

II. The PAMS Design Project The Product and Manufacturing System design project, known as PAMS [1], was started in the 1988/89 session as a means of integrating the diverse material covered on the Manufacturing Engineering programmes, and to provide an opportunity for students to learn and practise transferable skills. The PAMS project is integral to one course module, Total Design; this module continues over the first three years of each degree programme, and in total constitutes one ninth of the students’ final degree. It is most heavily weighted in the second year.

Fisher, P., & Quick, N., & Steiner, S. (1997, June), Product Design And Manufacturing Systems (Pams) In Manufacturing Engineering A Lesson In Team Working Paper presented at 1997 Annual Conference, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. https://peer.asee.org/6745

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