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Production and Characterization of Graphene and Other 2-dimensional Nanomaterials: An AP High School Inquiry Lab (Curriculum Exchange)

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Curriculum Exchange

Tagged Division

K-12 & Pre-College Engineering

Page Count

3

Page Numbers

26.1257.1 - 26.1257.3

DOI

10.18260/p.24594

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24594

Download Count

89

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Paper Authors

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Alison Lynn Fielding Centennial High School, Boise, ID

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Mrs. Alison Fielding teaches Advanced Placement Chemistry and College Preparatory Chemistry at Centennial High School in Boise, ID. She earned her BS in Earth Science Education from Boise State University in 2013 with a minors in Chemistry. She is currently pursuing a Masters of Science degree in STEM from Boise State University. In an effort to explore new pedagogical approaches she worked with Boise State University’s Integrated NanoMaterials Laboratory as part of a Research Experience for Teachers in Materials for Energy and Sustainability where she developed a guided inquiry laboratory to introduce students to 2-dimensional nanomaterials. A devoted family woman and working professional, Alison has been married for 19 years and has 4 beautiful children. She is committed to her role as an educator and balances life and work by taking advantage of Boise’s easy access to outdoor activities and sports.

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Dale Brown Boise State University

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Dale Brown earned an M.S. in Physics from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2011. Dale also holds a B.S. in Physics and a B.S. in Biochemistry with a minor in Mathematics from Northwest Nazarene University where he graduate Magna Cum Laude in 2010. Dale’s current research focus at Boise State University includes investigating large-scale synthesis of 2-dimensional materials, experimental and theoretical investigations of their physical properties, and their practical applications in the space and nuclear industries. Dale is the past recipient of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission graduate research fellowship through the Boise State Nuclear Materials Fellowship Program and a current recipient of a NASA EPSCoR graduate fellowship.

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Richard Livingston Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, Boise State University

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Richard Livingston is a senior at Boise State University, and will receive his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. During his time at Boise State Richard worked for the Integrated Nanon materials Laboratory(INML) . While at INML Richard has aided in design of the universities first chemical vapor deposition system, and has implemented the labs capabilities for liquid exfoliation of two-dimensional materials. Out side of class and work Richard is student member of American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME), American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), vice president of Boise States Rocket Club, and an active member of Boise States Aerospace Club. He is also an active mountain bike and motocross rider.

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Curtis Heishman Boise State University

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Curtis Heishman attended Davis & Elkins College in Elkins, WV where Dr. Floyd Wiseman mentored and sparked an interest for him in conducting chemistry research. He attended a chemistry REU program at Boise State University with Dr. Eric Brown. There they conducted research of the bioinorganic synthesis of compounds replicating the mechanism by which carbonic anhydrase processes greenhouse gasses. Most recently, Curtis has worked with Dr. Dave Estrada and Dr. Kevin Ausman conducting research of 2D nanoparticles as part of a materials science REU at Boise State. He is currently continuing that research while working towards an undergraduate degree in chemistry at Boise State.

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Louis Nadelson Utah State University

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Louis S. Nadelson is an associate professor and lead researcher for the Center for the School of the Future in the Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services at Utah State University. He has a BS from Colorado State University, a BA from the Evergreen State College, a MEd from Western Washington University, and a PhD in educational psychology from UNLV. His scholarly interests include all areas of STEM teaching and learning, inservice and preservice teacher professional development, program evaluation, multidisciplinary research, and conceptual change. Nadelson uses his over 20 years of high school and college math, science, computer science, and engineering teaching to frame his research on STEM teaching and learning. Nadelson brings a unique perspective of research, bridging experience with practice and theory to explore a range of interests in STEM teaching and learning.

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David Estrada Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID, USA

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David received his Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from UIUC in 2009, and his Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering at UIUC in 2013 under the direction of Prof. Eric Pop. David then joined Prof. Rashid Bashir’s Laboratory of Integrated Bio Medical Micro/Nanotechnology Applications as a Visiting Postdoctoral Researcher before moving to the Materials Science and Engineering Department at Boise State University. David is a member of Tau Beta Pi, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Materials Research Society, the American Chemical Society, the American Physical Society, and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. He is the recipient of the NSF, NDSEG, SURGE, and Micron Graduate Fellowships. His work has been recognized with several awards, including the Gregory Stillman, John Bardeen, and Lieutenant General Thomas M. Rienzi graduate research awards. His research interests are in the areas of emergent semiconductor nanomaterials and bionanotechnology.

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Abstract

Production and Characterization of Graphene and Other 2-dimensional Nanomaterials: An AP High School Inquiry Lab (Curriculum Exchange)According to the National Nanotechnology Initiative, nanoscience and nanotechnology areexpected to play key roles in developing solutions to some of our greatest global engineeringchallenges in energy, medicine, security, and scientific discovery. There is high expectation thatdevelopments in nanotechnology will lead to new job creation and become an economic driverwith new direction for research and development coming from nano-enabled products. In light ofthe potential economic and national security implications, it is imperative that we support thedevelopment of the next generation of the high school curriculum as a way to motivate studentstowards pursuing education and careers in nanotechnology. Recent advances in nanomaterialsprocessing, particularly 2-dimensional nanomaterials synthesis, present the opportunity tointegrate nanotechnology curriculum into high schools in safe and relatively inexpensivemanners. The multifunctional characteristics of 2-dimensional nanomaterials make themattractive for printable and flexible electronics, nanostructured thermoelectrics, photovoltaics,batteries, and biological and chemical sensors. Thus, 2-dimensional nanomaterials provide anideal context for high school students to investigate the principles of nanoscience andnanotechnology.  In our work, we present an Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry Inquiry Laboratory (CIL),which is being implemented at Centennial High School in Meridian, Idaho. The CIL is aligned toNational College Board requirements for AP Chemistry courses as well as Next GenerationScience Standards. The laboratory is designed to encompass approximately five hours of time,including teacher preparation time, pre-laboratory activities, materials synthesis andcharacterization, and a field trip to a local industry partner for scanning electron microscopyanalysis of the resultant nanomaterials. Students are organized into small groups under thecontext that they are working to produce and characterize nanomaterials as part of an industryresearch team. To synthesis the 2-dimensional nanomaterials, students use cosolvent exfoliationof layered materials such as graphite, MoS2, WS2, and hBN. The students must then use opticalspectroscopy and electrical characterization techniques to determine if their material is aconductor, semiconductor, or an insulator. The students then use scanning electron microscopyto image the morphology of the 2-dimensional nanoflakes they produced, which exposes thestudents to advanced nanoscale characterization techniques. 

Fielding, A. L., & Brown, D., & Livingston, R., & Heishman, C., & Nadelson, L., & Estrada, D. (2015, June), Production and Characterization of Graphene and Other 2-dimensional Nanomaterials: An AP High School Inquiry Lab (Curriculum Exchange) Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24594

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015