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Promoting Technological Literacy Among Mathematics, Science And Technology Teachers: A Graduate Studies Course

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Technological Literacy for K-12 and for Community College Students: Concepts, Assessment, and Courses

Tagged Division

Technological Literacy Constituent Committee

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

15.1003.1 - 15.1003.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15842

Download Count

12

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Paper Authors

author page

Moshe Barak Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Promoting Technological Literacy among Mathematics, Science and Technology Teachers: A Graduate Studies Course Abstract

This paper addresses a graduate course aimed at fostering technological literacy among K-12 mathematics, science and technology teachers. The course includes: 1) discussing broad questions, such as what is technology and how technology relates to other fields, for example, mathematics, science and engineering; 2) learning a specific subject in technology, for example, basic concepts in control systems; and 3) experiencing the process of designing, constructing and improving a technological system, for example, robotics. s on this experience indicate that individuals having a background in exact sciences are frequently interested in learning technological concepts and are capable of handling relatively challenging technological tasks in a short time. Based on our experience, it is suggested to adapt the following guidelines in designing programs aimed at fostering technological literacy: l interests; learning through hands-on activities in a rich technological environment; fostering peer-learning and collaboration in the class; and encouraging participants to reflect on their learning.

. Introduction

Subjects such as mathematics, science and technology are currently being instructed in school as separate disciplines, and teachers often teach specific subject matter and have only little knowledge about subjects not within their area of expertise. Only few teachers understand broad terms such as technology and technological literacy. In the Department for Science and Education at, we feel it is important to promote technological literacy among mathematics, science and technology teachers in order to enhance their understanding of technology and open routes for incorporating technology and engineering concepts into teaching other school subjects. This is the rationale behind the technology course we are offering our graduate students, as described in this paper.

The Aspects of Teaching Technology and Science Course

The course is delivered to K-12 mathematics, science and technology teachers studying for MSc or PhD degrees in science and technology education. About 20 students take this course every year during one semester (13 weeks, three hours a week). The course is comprised of the following three main parts: 1) discussing broad questions such as what is technology and how technology relates to other fields, for example, science and engineering; 2) learning a specific subject in technology, for example, basic concepts in control systems; and 3) experiencing the process of designing, constructing and improving a technological system, for example, robotics. The following section of this paper will describe in more

Barak, M. (2010, June), Promoting Technological Literacy Among Mathematics, Science And Technology Teachers: A Graduate Studies Course Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/15842

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