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Proven Professional Development Strategies: Data from an ENG ASAP Transfer Student Program

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Design in Engineering Education Division: Design Mental Frameworks

Tagged Division

Design in Engineering Education

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

24

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/33212

Download Count

5

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Paper Authors

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Armando A. Rodriguez Arizona State University

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Prior to joining the ASU Electrical Engineering faculty in 1990, Dr. Armando A. Rodriguez worked at MIT, IBM, AT&T Bell Laboratories and Raytheon Missile Systems. He has also consulted for Eglin Air Force Base, Boeing Defense and Space Systems, Honeywell and NASA. He has published over 200 technical papers in refereed journals and conference proceedings – over 60 with students. He has authored three engineering texts on classical controls, linear systems, and multivariable control. Dr. Rodriguez has given over 70 invited presentations - 13 plenary - at international and national forums, conferences and corporations. Since 1994, he has directed an extensive engineering mentoring-research academic success and professional development (ASAP) program that has served over 500 students. These efforts have been supported by NSF STEP, S-STEM, and CSEM grants as well as industry. Dr. Rodriguez' research interests include: control of nonlinear distributed parameter, and sampled-data systems; modeling, simulation, animation, and real-time control (MoSART) of Flexible Autonomous Machines operating in an uncertain Environment (FAME); design and control of micro-air vehicles (MAVs), control of bio-economic systems, renewable resources, and sustainable development; control of semiconductor, (hypersonic) aerospace, robotic, and low power electronic systems. Recently, he has worked closely with NASA researchers on the design of scramjet-powered hypersonic vehicles. Dr. Rodriguez’ honors include: AT&T Bell Laboratories Fellowship; Boeing A.D. Welliver Fellowship; ASU Engineering Teaching Excellence Award; IEEE International Outstanding Advisor Award; White House Presidential Excellence Award for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring; Ralf Yorque Memorial Best Paper Prize. Dr. Rodriguez has also served on various national technical committees and panels. He is currently serving on the following National Academies panels: Survivability and Lethality Analysis, Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Autonomous Systems. Dr. Rodriguez received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1990. Personal Web site: http://aar.faculty.asu.edu/

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Nirangkush Das Arizona State University

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Nirangkush Das is the Research Associate in the NSF S-STEM grant 1565177. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D in the department of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering (ECEE) at Arizona State University.

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Brent Wallace Arizona State University

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Brent Wallace is an undergraduate Electrical Engineering student at Arizona State University. He specializes in the study of control systems. Brent is currently in the process of completing his junior year of undergraduate study and plans to start his PhD immediately after graduation.

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Phil Blake McBride Eastern Arizona College

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Dr. Phil McBride received a B.S. from the University of Arizona in 1986, a M.A.T. in 1989 from Northern Arizona University and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Miami University in 2003. He taught high school in Northern Arizona for 5 years before moving to Eastern Arizona College in 1991 to teach chemistry. He was recognized by the EAC Student Association as the most admired faculty in 1993, received the Alumni Faculty Recognition award in 1996, the distinguished service award in 1997, and in 2008 received the Rocky Mountain Region College Educator Award for Excellence in Teaching by the American Chemical Society. He has presented at the Southeastern Arizona Teachers Academy, the ASTA Annual Conference, NSTA, ACS, and the Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (BCCE). He is a member of ASEE, ASTA, NSTA, AAPT, ACS, and 2YC3. He is the current membership secretary of ASTA, a position which he has held since 2010. He has been a volunteer with the Boy Scouts of America for the past 25 years and was a recipient of the Silver Beaver Award. For the past 12 years, he has served as Dean of Instruction, while continuing to teach Organic Chemistry.

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Clark Vangilder Central Arizona College

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Prior to obtaining a BS in Mathematics in 1995, I served in the US Navy as a Submarine Nuclear Propulsion Plant Operator from 1985 – 1991. Subsequent to the BS degree, I obtained employment with DeVry University from 1998 – 2008; during which, I completed a Master’s degree in Physics, with an emphasis on Physics Education. Since 2008, I have been the Professor of Physics at Central Arizona College. In February of 2016, I completed a PhD program in General Psychology with an emphasis in Cognition & Instruction.

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Tim S. Frank Glendale Community College

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Dr. Tim Frank grew up on the west side of Phoenix. After high school, he attended Baylor University, where he was a dual major in electrical engineering and physics. He graduated in 1990 with a B.S. degree, and then went on to attend the California Institute of Technology, and earned a Master’s of Science degree in applied physics in 1992 and a Ph.D. in 1998, with his area of research focusing on computing with artificial neural networks. While finishing his Ph.D. dissertation, he taught computer programming and circuit analysis courses for 2½ years within the electrical engineering department at Purdue University's Indianapolis campus, (IUPUI). Dr. Frank returned to the Phoenix area in the fall of 1999. He taught computer programming, physics, and math courses for Western International University and Estrella Mountain Community College, before becoming the engineering instructor at South Mountain Community College in the fall of 2000. Tim worked at SMCC until May 2016, when he transferred to Glendale Community College to become their engineering program director.

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John W. Griffith Mesa Community College

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John received his B.S. in Physics and Math from East Texas State University (now known as Texas A&M at Commerce) in 1988 and his Ph.D. in Solid State Physics from Oregon State University in 2002. He has been a full-time faculty member in Physics at the Two-Year College level since the Fall of 1993, with the last 13 years at Mesa Community College. John has had an interest in helping prepare future engineers since he began full-time teaching in 1993. He has participated in extended professional development activities funded by the NSF such as the Two-Year College Physics Faculty Enhancement Program (PEPTYC) and the Quantum Optics Advanced Technological Education Program, an NSF-sponsored Faculty Enhancement Program for Two-Year College Physics Faculty Members (QOPEPTYC).

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Russell Cox Mohave Community College

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Russell A. Y. Cox

PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION
Iowa State University Electrical Engineering 2004 B.S.
Marquette University Electrical Engineering 2007 M.S.
Marquette University Electrical Engineering 2011 Ph.D.

APPOINTMENTS
2012-Present Resident Faculty, Mohave Community College, Kingman, Arizona
2011-2012 Instructor, Baker College of Muskegon, Muskegon, Michigan
2004-2011 Research/Teaching Assistant, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
2002-2004 Tutor, Iowa State University Academic Success Center, Ames, Iowa

RECENT PUBLICATIONS
• Russell Cox, Fabien Josse, Stephen Heinrich, Isabelle Dufour, Oliver Brand, “Characteristics of Laterally Vibrating Resonant Microcantilevers in Viscous Liquid Media”, Journal of Applied Physics, 111 (1), 2012, 14 pages, jap.aip.org
• Russell Cox, Jinjin Zhang, Luke Beardslee, Fabien Josse, Stephen Heinrich, Oliver Brand, Isabelle Dufour, “Damping and Mass Sensitivity of Laterally Vibrating Resonant Microcantilevers in Viscous Liquid Media,” Frequency Control Symposium (FCS), 2011 IEEE International, 2011, 6 pages, ieeexplore.ieee.org
• Russell Cox, Fabien Josse, Stephen Heinrich, Isabelle Dufour, Oliver Brand, "Resonant microcantilevers vibrating laterally in viscous liquid media," Frequency Control Symposium (FCS), 2010 IEEE International, June 1-4, 2010, 5 pages, ieeexplore.ieee.org
• Russell Cox, Mike Wenzel, Fabien Josse, Stephen Heinrich, Isabelle Dufour, “Generalized Model of Resonant Polymer-Coated Microcantilevers in Viscous Liquid Media” Analytical. Chemistry, 80 (15), 2008, 7 pages, pubs.acs.org/journal/ancham
• Russell Cox, Mike Wenzel, Fabien Josse, Stephen Heinrich, Isabelle Dufour, "Generalized Characteristics of Resonant Polymer-Coated Microcantilevers in Viscous Liquid Media," Frequency Control Symposium, 2007 Joint with the 21st European Frequency and Time Forum. IEEE International, May 29-June 1, 2007, 5 pages, ieeexplore.ieee.org

SYNERGISTIC ACTIVITIES
• Adviser for Kingman area FIRST Robotics group

Most Recent Awards, Scholarships and Honor Societies
•Funded through Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) Program, 2004-2009
•Member of Eta Kappa Nu, 2003-2009
•Member of Sigma Xi, 2007-2008
•Member of IEEE, 2008-2009
• Extra License in Amateur Radio
•Passed the Fundamentals of Engineering exam, Electrical Engineering Focus


COLLABORATORS AND OTHER AFFILIATIONS
Collaborators: Arizona State University: Mary Anderson-Rowland, Mohave Community College: Jill Loveless
Thesis Advisers: Fabien Josse, Stephen Heinrich, (Marquette University), Isabelle Dufour (Université Bordeaux).

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Eddie W. Ong Phoenix College

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Ernest Moulinet Villicana Phoenix College Engineering

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Arizona Native, BSEE & MSEE Arizona State University, Mesa Community College transfer student, 35 years of industry experience in electronic design, product engineering, technical marketing, Executive management, President/CEO/Founder. Worked in startups to Fortune 500 sized companies in the fields of government electronics (satellite communications, smart munitions, radar, drone), biomedical (pacemaker, drug pump, deep brain stimulation), semiconductors (PIC microcomputers), energy IT (smart electric meters, domestic and international). Most recently Instructed college level engineering courses for 7 years.

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Celia . Jenkins Cochise College

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As STEM and Recruitment Coordinator, Jenkins is responsible for STEM student support in university transfers and in job placement, research opportunities and internships. Jenkins is the PI of the NSF ASAP Project Based Engineering grant with Arizona State University. Jenkins has increased enrollment in Engineering from three declared majors in 2009 to 120 in fall of 2018. Jenkins manages a team of College Success Navigators embedded in all Cochise county high schools. Currently, Jenkins sits on the governing board of Villages of Vigneto, is a member of IEEE WIE, and AFCEA.

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Abstract

This RESEARCH PAPER, motivated by the need to produce more engineers to meet the needs of the nation, describes an engineering (ENG) Academic-Success-and-Professional-Development (ASAP) project-based scholarship-mentoring program (NSF funded since 2001) [Anderson-Rowland-et.al.-ASEE, 2012; FIE-2013].. This paper specifically describes key professional-development-instruments, practices, and efficacy – providing data for 3 recent scholar cohorts at the lead-institution [Anderson-Rowland-WEPAN-2011;Anderson-Rowland-FIE-2011]. Theoretical Framework, Constructs, Instruments, and Practices. The program involves a lead-institution and 9-partnering community-colleges (CCs) [FIE, 2018]. While the program focuses on upper-division (lower-division) CC transfer-students at lead (partnering) institutions, it also addresses the needs of traditional (and some continuing-program-graduate) students at the lead institution. Scholars and the over 100 mentoring faculty, and many more industry/peer-mentors, are united by a growing community-of-practice (COP) – involving a common ENG ASAP domain, common background (academic-success, financial-need), common-resources, and collective-interactive-learning that provides substantive-support and leads to new collective-communal-knowledge. At the heart of the program is becoming Aware, taking Control and pursuing Excellence (ACE), becoming a critical-thinker/questioner (continuously-refining-one’s-thinking; Paul-Elder-2012), active-project-based-learning, setting SMART (specific-measurable-achievable-relevant-timely) goals, and using required career-steering/shaping projects as a mechanism for preparing for the many opportunities that lay ahead (e.g. paid projects, internships/jobs, graduate school). A Motivated-Engineering-Transfer-Student (METS) Center provides a home-away-from-home for scholars to work/network. An Intelligent-and-Autonomous-Embedded-Systems-Laboratory supports project work. All scholars at the lead institution are required to take a 2-Credit ASAP-class while on scholarship. The class exploits key time-tested professional-development-instruments (projects,interest-paper,career-planning,career-fair-plea,statement-of-purpose,engineering-portfolio). Main Results: Data-for-3-Cohorts (Fall2017-Spring2018-Fall2019). Demographics for these cohorts of 90-74-76 scholars follows [FIE-2018]: females:44-40.5-43%, female/minority:57-59.5-61%, new-scholars:71-8-36%, transfers:77-77-81%, new-transfers:20-21.6-17%, in-state:95-93-96%, 9-partnering-CCs:43-42-44%, juniors:62-67.56-20%, seniors:31-28.38-75%, 4+1MS:38-31-32%, graduate:7-4-5%, ME:26-25.6-14.5%, CS:19-19.9-21%, CSE:3-4.1-5.3%, EE:16-13.5-21%, Biomed:10-10.8-9.2%, ChemE:10-9.45-6.6%, Aero:5-2.7-5.3%, Civil:4-4-5.3%, Materials:4-5.4-3.9%, OtherMajors:4-4.65-5.2%, GPA:3.46-3.40-3.3.49/4.0 (3.75-3.69-3.78/4.33), average-age:24-24-24, working-10-hours-or-more/week:51-54-47%, married:21-18.9-21, have-children:16.7-14.86-16.7%, parents-with-no-college-education:37-39.18-38%, family-income<$50K:60-59.4-60%, no-prior-internship-project-experience:19.4-18.9-19.59%. The paper will show how each of the above groups have been impacted by our professional-development-instruments/practices. Data will be presented on career-planning, participating-in-the-ongoing-technological-revolution, choosing-a-technical-area, what-impacted-the-technical-area-choice, associated-difficulties-in-choosing-the-technical-area, preparing-for-a-career-fair, career-fair-pitch, statement-of-purpose, self-assessment-of-assignments, and how our interest-paper and mentoring helps with each of the proceeding. Comparisons with prior papers will also be made [Anderson-Rowland-WEPAN-2011; Anderson-Rowland-FIE-2011;Anderson-Rowland-et.al.-ASEE, 2012;FIE-2013]. The paper will show how Satty’s-Analytic-Hierarchical-Process (AHP-1982-1994-2009) is used to assist students in selecting technical-areas and prospective companies. 86% of scholars generally find our interest-paper very-useful-for-career-planning-career-fair-preparation-project-initiation. While our framework has helped all scholars (~75% really-well), some 25% struggle a bit (e.g. focusing-more-on-short-term-rather-than-long-term-issues, formulating-a-clear-project-problem, knowing-how-to-start, setting-SMART-goals, and confidence). The latter are typically new-transfers, new-scholars, at-risk groups (women-and-underrepresented-minority-students, students-working-more-than-15-hours, students-with-low-GPAs, students-with-low-parental-income/education-backgrounds). These professional-development-struggles are usually highly-correlated with academic-success-issues in 1-2 classes (41%) , not-knowing-how-to-choose-a-technical-area for-a-project and getting-started/defining-a-problem (52%). The percentage of scholars seeking mentoring-for-professional-development have been roughly ~91-86-88%. The paper will describe how many mentors scholars have, how mentoring has impacted them professionally, how each-of-the-above-subgroups (within-and-across-cohorts) have been impacted and associated reasons. It should be noted that two other team ASEE-2019-submissions by-the-authors focus on overall-program analysis and detailed analysis of academic-success instruments/practices, respectively. Lessons Learned and Future Directions. The paper will summarize specific lessons learned and provide future directions; e.g. how to best help students to get-started on projects - taking their next step, setting SMART-goals and exploiting-our-community-of-mentors.

Rodriguez, A. A., & Das, N., & Wallace, B., & McBride, P. B., & Vangilder, C., & Frank, T. S., & Griffith, J. W., & Cox, R., & Ong, E. W., & Villicana, E. M., & Jenkins, C. (2019, June), Proven Professional Development Strategies: Data from an ENG ASAP Transfer Student Program Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/33212

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