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Range Determination Algorithm Performed On Mars Exploration Rover Stereo Images

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Approaches & Techniques in Engineering I

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

10.1050.1 - 10.1050.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/14322

Download Count

18

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Paper Authors

author page

Eric Wasatonic

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Aldo Morales

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Sedig Agili

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Range Determination Algorithm Performed on Mars Exploration Rover Stereo Images Eric Wasatonic, Sedig Agili and Aldo Morales Electrical Engineering Program Penn State Harrisburg 777 West Harrisburg Pike Middletown, PA 17057

Abstract

The electrical engineering students at Penn State Harrisburg have an ample opportunity to pursue interests in electrical and electronic circuits, including digital circuits and VLSI and its fabrication, microprocessors and their applications, electromagnetics, communications, control systems, digital signal/image processing and computer vision. They also have opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge through hands-on course projects and laboratory experiences, in the above fields. In this paper, an example of an image processing application project is developed, in the context of an image-processing course. This paper presents an algorithm that uses stereo images, obtained from two cameras mounted on the Mars Exploration Rovers, to determine the range of distant objects in the images by using correlation and triangulation. The initial value obtained by the algorithm was not accurate because it did not take into account the fact that the range of an object beyond the camera’s focal point is non-linear in appearance, and to the non- linearity of the camera lens, thus the range obtained was subjected to correction to compensate for these two factors. The results obtained by the algorithm are comparable to those obtained by NASA.

I. Introduction

Penn State Harrisburg offers Bachelor of Science in EE, BS EET, and Master in Electrical Engineering degrees. The BS EE program provides an opportunity for students to pursue interests in electrical and electronic circuits, including digital circuits and VLSI and its fabrication, microprocessors and their applications, electromagnetics, communications, control systems, digital signal/image processing and computer vision. The BSEET program provides similar experience however, its strengths include: an applied, hands-on approach and extensive laboratory experience. Through a senior capstone design project, both curricula emphasize written as well as verbal communication and a teamwork approach among students to attain a common goal. Students in the DSP, communication, senior project and other courses have ample opportunities to demonstrate their acquired knowledge through course projects. In addition, the EE and EET programs at PSU Harrisburg are ABET accredited and one of the ABET requirements is to have program outcomes. Indeed, one of the electrical engineering program outcomes1 states that “A graduate from the Electrical Engineering program at Penn State Harrisburg will demonstrate the ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. • A student will be able to classify problem types (i.e. analysis vs. design) and select appropriate solution methods. • A student will be able to integrate solution methods to a problem that may include several engineering problems.”

Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition. Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education

Wasatonic, E., & Morales, A., & Agili, S. (2005, June), Range Determination Algorithm Performed On Mars Exploration Rover Stereo Images Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/14322

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