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Reach Out And Dsp Someone!

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Conference

2004 Annual Conference

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 20, 2004

Start Date

June 20, 2004

End Date

June 23, 2004

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Portable/Embedded Computing II

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

9.1038.1 - 9.1038.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/14071

Download Count

32

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Paper Authors

author page

Michael Morrow

author page

Thad Welch

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 3620

Reach Out and DSP Someone!

Thad B. Welch Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering U.S. Naval Academy, MD

Michael G. Morrow Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI

Cameron H. G. Wright Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Wyoming, WY

Abstract

In recent years, more and more students have been designing and implementing small sys- tems using real-time DSP hardware. Given the decreasing cost and the increasing capability of DSP starter kits (DSKs) and evaluation modules (EVMs), these projects are being used by greater numbers of educators as a valuable pedagogical tool. Currently, the ability to easily control a number of electrical loads totaling several hundred watts using DSKs or EVMs does not readily exist. Yet DSP control of significant electrical loads can add depth and interest to many student projects. This paper will discuss the design, construction, and use of a very compact, dual-tone multiple-frequency (DTMF) based decoder and power switching device. These devices have been successfully and enthusiastically used by a number of undergradu- ate and graduate students to allow their DSP algorithms to control their world, or to put it another way, to Reach Out and DSP Someone!

1 INTRODUCTION

For several years now, we have been suggesting and providing proven DSP teaching methodologies, hardware and software solutions, and DSP tools that have helped motivate students and faculty to implement DSP-based systems in real-time [1 6]. These efforts have emphasized the fact that DSP is much more than just a collection of theories and problem solving techniques. Students can easily be motivated to explore and implement DSP-based systems in an environment where they are limited only by their imagination.

This process can be facilitated through real-time demonstration programs such as winDSK and winDSK6 [7], running on real-time DSP hardware. Given the decreasing cost and the increasing capability of various DSP starter kits (DSKs) and evaluation modules (EVMs), these projects are being used by greater numbers of educators as a valuable pedagogical tool. To help keep the cost relatively low, most DSKs and EVMs are designed to work with audio input and output signals. Digital input/output pins are sometimes available, but the ability to easily control a number of electrical loads totaling several hundred watts does not readily exist. Yet DSP control of signi cant electrical loads can add depth and interest to many student projects.

Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright c 2004, American Society for Engineering Education

Wright, C., & Morrow, M., & Welch, T. (2004, June), Reach Out And Dsp Someone! Paper presented at 2004 Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/14071

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