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Redshirt in Engineering: A Model for Improving Equity and Inclusion

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Conference

2018 CoNECD - The Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity Conference

Location

Crystal City, Virginia

Publication Date

April 29, 2018

Start Date

April 29, 2018

End Date

May 2, 2018

Conference Session

Undergraduate Track - Technical Session III

Tagged Topics

Diversity and Undergraduate Education

Page Count

13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29571

Download Count

50

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Paper Authors

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Beth A. Myers University of Colorado, Boulder

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Beth A. Myers is the Director of Assessment and Accreditation at the University of Colorado Boulder. She holds a BA in biochemistry, ME in engineering management and PhD in civil engineering. Her interests are in quantitative and qualitative research and data analysis as related to equity in education.

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Emily Knaphus-Soran University of Washington

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Emily Knaphus-Soran is a Research Associate at the Center for Evaluation & Research for STEM Equity (CERSE) at the University of Washington. She works on the evaluation of several projects aimed at improving diversity, equity, and inclusion in STEM fields. She also conducts research on the social-psychological and institutional forces that contribute to the persistence of race and class inequalities in the United States. Emily earned a PhD and MA in Sociology from the University of Washington, and a BA in Sociology from Smith College.

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Donna C. Llewellyn Boise State University

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Donna Crystal Llewellyn received her BA (major in Mathematics and minor in Economics) with High Honors from Swarthmore College in 1980. She went on to earn an MS in Operations Research from Stanford University in 1981 and a Ph.D. in Operations Research from Cornell University in 1984. After 30 years at Georgia Tech in a variety of roles, Donna became the Executive Director of the new Institute for STEM and Diversity Initiatives at Boise State University in January 2015. Donna's current interests center around education issues in general, and in particular on increasing access and success of those traditionally under-represented and/or under-served in STEM higher education.

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Ann Delaney Boise State University

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Ann Delaney graduated in 2016 with her Masters in Materials Science & Engineering with an interdisciplinary emphasis in Public Policy and Administration from Boise State University. Her thesis was entitled, "Nanomanufacturing Outside of the Lab: An Academic-Industry Partnership Case Study.” She also received her B.S. in Materials Science & Engineering from Boise State in 2014. In the Spring of 2016, Ann was recognized as part of the first cohort of University Innovation Fellows at Boise State, and has worked as a Fellow to collect and incorporate student feedback into future plans for makerspaces on the Boise State campus. As an undergraduate and graduate student, she has been involved with the Society of Women Engineers, and also taught a materials science laboratory course as a graduate teaching assistant. She has volunteered at numerous STEM outreach activities on and off of the Boise State campus throughout her time as a student and is passionate about increasing diversity in STEM and helping girls and women to recognize that STEM is a path that is open to them if they want to take it.

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Sonya Cunningham University of Washington

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Director of STARS Program
Diversity & Access
College of Engineering

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Pamela Cosman University of California, San Diego Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-4012-0176

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Pamela C. Cosman received the B.S. degree with Honor in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 1987 and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1993. In 1995 she joined the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, and is currently a Professor. She has published over 250 journal and conference papers in the areas of image/video compression and processing and wireless communications. She served as Director of the Center for Wireless Communications (2006-2008), Associate Dean for Students of the Jacobs School of Engineering (2013-2016), and Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications (2006-2009). Her awards include the 2016 UC San Diego Affirmative Action and Diversity Award, and the 2017 Athena Pinnacle Award (Individual in Education). She is a member of Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Xi, and a Fellow of the IEEE.

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Tanya D. Ennis University of Colorado, Boulder

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TANYA D. ENNIS is the current Engineering GoldShirt Program Director at the University of Colorado Boulder’s College of Engineering and Applied Science. She received her M.S. in Computer Engineering from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and her B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Her career in the telecommunications industry included positions in software and systems engineering and technical project management. Tanya taught mathematics at the Denver School of Science and Technology, the highest performing high school in Denver Public Schools. She is a PhD student in the School of Education at University of Colorado Boulder studying Learning Sciences and Human Development.

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Katherine Christine Tetrick Washington State University

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Katherine directs the STARS program at Washington State University. She has a Master's degree in Mathematics with a teaching emphasis.

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Eve A. Riskin University of Washington

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Eve Riskin received her BS degree in Electrical Engineering from
M.I.T. and her graduate degrees in EE from Stanford. Since 1990, she
has been in the EE Department at the University of Washington where
she is now Associate Dean of Diversity and Access in the College of
Engineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Director of the
ADVANCE Center for Institutional Change. With ADVANCE, she works on
mentoring and leadership development programs for women faculty in
SEM. Her research interests include image compression and image
processing, with a focus on developing video compression algorithms to
allow for cell-phone transmission of American Sign Language. She was
awarded a National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award, a
Sloan Research Fellowship, the 2006 WEPAN University Change Agent
award, the 2006 Hewlett-Packard Harriett B. Rigas Award, and the 2007
University of Washington David B. Thorud Leadership Award.
She is a Fellow of the IEEE.

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Janet Callahan Boise State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6665-1584

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Janet Callahan is Dean of Engineering at Michigan Technological University. Dr. Callahan received her Ph.D. in Materials Science, M.S. in Metallurgy, and B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Connecticut. Her educational research interests include retention, mathematics and materials science teaching and learning, first-year programs, accreditation, K-12 STEM education, and faculty development.

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Kevin Pitts University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, Professor of Physics

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Abstract

The NSF-funded Redshirt in Engineering Consortium was formed in 2016 with the goal of enhancing the ability of academically talented but underprepared students coming from low-income backgrounds to successfully graduate with engineering degrees. The Consortium takes its name from the practice of redshirting in college athletics, with the idea of providing an extra year and support to help promising engineering students complete a bachelor’s degree. The Consortium builds on the success of three existing “academic redshirt” programs and expands the model to three new schools. The Existing Redshirt Institutions (ERIs) help mentor and train the new Student Success Partners (SSP), and SSPs contribute their unique expertise to help ERIs improve existing redshirt programs. This Work in Progress paper describes the history of the Redshirt in Engineering Consortium; the Redshirt model as a framework for addressing issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in engineering; and initial lessons learned from the implementation of the model across unique institutional contexts.

Myers, B. A., & Knaphus-Soran, E., & Llewellyn, D. C., & Delaney, A., & Cunningham, S., & Cosman, P., & Ennis, T. D., & Tetrick, K. C., & Riskin, E. A., & Callahan, J., & Pitts, K. (2018, April), Redshirt in Engineering: A Model for Improving Equity and Inclusion Paper presented at 2018 CoNECD - The Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity Conference, Crystal City, Virginia. https://peer.asee.org/29571

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