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Relational Development as a Cornerstone of Success in Latino STEM Retention

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Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Mentoring Minorities: Effective Programs, Practices, and Perspectives

Tagged Division

Minorities in Engineering

Page Count

24

Page Numbers

24.1036.1 - 24.1036.24

DOI

10.18260/1-2--22969

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22969

Download Count

188

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Paper Authors

biography

DaVina J. Hoyt Washington State University

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Dr. DaVina J. Hoyt holds a Post Doc / Faculty appointment at Washington State University in The School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. Dr. Hoyt is an inclusive community building specialist with over 13 years of diversity training, cultural competency programming, community development and cross-cultural collaborative experience. She has a strong background in designing and implementing programs that help to facilitate community building and inclusiveness. Dr. Hoyt is a visionary, versatile and engaging professional with a record of building linkages across sectors and geographical boundaries.

Her background is multicultural; her work experience varied and her interests multitudinous. She is an educational researcher and independent consultant who has travelled extensively doing research, motivational speaking and trainings for individuals, corporations, nonprofit organizations and educational institutions. Dr. Hoyt’s work cuts across several countries in Africa, Caribbean and Europe. She has presented her research on inclusive community building using the groundbreaking Ellison Model at conferences in the U.S., Bahamas, Italy and Nigeria.

In addition to diversity and inclusiveness, Dr. Hoyt’s research also looks at the ability of Africa-American females to break the glass ceiling in education. Dr. Hoyt is a connector, mentor and educator who is passionate about promoting education and assisting low income students to access the resources they need to enable them thrive and succeed academically. She also works with students of all racial backgrounds to teach them how to develop relationships across racial, ethnic and social economic lines in order to build inclusive communities based on trust, honor and respect.

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biography

Charles Pezeshki Washington State University

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Dr. Charles Pezeshki is a professor in mechanical engineering at Washington State University, and runs the Industrial Design Clinic, where students work on real-world industry problems with specified deliverables for their capstone projects. He is also interested in global engineering and the evolution of engineering education.

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biography

J. Manuel Acevedo Washington State University

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J. Manuel Acevedo, Director, Office of Multicultural Student Services at Washington State University
Compton Union Room 409
PO Box 647204
Pullman, WA 99164-7204
(509)335-1071 ~ acevedo@wsu.edu

EDUCATION

Washington State University, M.Ed., 1995, Counseling Psychology
Universidad Santo Tomas, 1990, BA, Education

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Director, Office of Multicultural Student Services, Washington State University, 2004-Present
Associate Director, Office of Multicultural Student Services, Washington State University, 2001-2004
Assistant Director, Office of Multicultural Student Services, Washington State University, 1996-2001
Retention Counselor, the Chicana/o Latina/o Student Center, Washington State University, 1991-1996

SELECTED SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES, PUBLICATIONS, AND PRESENTATIONS

Faculty of Record, Ed Ad 497, Peer Leadership - Team Mentoring Program. WSU, 2007– Present.
A leadership seminar designed to enhance mentors’ theoretical understanding of mentoring, identifying mentoring style, and further facilitate continued development of mentoring skills, gaining knowledge about the University resources with particular emphasis on those available to students in the STEM disciplines. Further, mentors should acquire in-depth understanding of what is needed to be a successful student in these academic fields.
Faculty of Record, Ed Ad 497, Peer Leadership - Multicultural Student Mentoring. WSU, 1993– 2007.
Acevedo, J. M., McCracken, V. (2007). Multicultural Student Retention Summit: Building University-wide Understanding and Commitment to Address Multicultural Student
Persistence, Achievement, and Graduation. 20th Annual Conference on Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education. San Francisco, California
Acevedo, J. M., McCracken V. (2006). Building University-wide Understanding and Commitment to Multicultural Student Persistence, Achievement, and Graduation. Washington State Faculty and Staff of Color in Higher Education 11th Annual Conference. Vancouver, Washington
Acevedo, J. M. (2005). Multicultural Student Persistence, Achievement, and Graduation: Critical Issues. Multicultural Student Retention Summit. Washington State University, Pullman
Acevedo, J. M., Herrera, R., Ramirez, J. (1999). “Building a Successful Multicultural Student Mentor Program: Foundation, Design, Implementation, and Evaluation.” 13th Annual National Conference on Student Retention, San Francisco, California
Acevedo, J. M., Herrera, R., Ramirez, J. (1999). “Peer Mentoring: Engaging Upper-Class Undergraduate Students in the Institutional Effort to Retain First Year Multicultural Students.” 18th Annual National Conference on the First-Year Experience. University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina

SPECIALTIES AND RESEARCH AREAS

Student development, retention, achievement, and graduation with specific emphasis on Multicultural student populations
Program development, implementation, and assessment
Area management towards service delivery to multicultural student populations
Student Mentoring in Higher Education

SELECTED SERVICE AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Member, American College Personnel Association (ACPA), 2000-Present
Member, Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (NASPA), 2004-present
Member, Member, Provost’s Council on Student Retention, Washington State University, 2006-2008
Chair, University Scholarship Coordinating Committee, Washington State University, 2006-2007
Advisor, Council of Multicultural Student Presidents (CMSP), Washington State University, 1996-present
Member, WSU Faculty Senate Washington State University, 1997-2000
Co-Chair, Chicana/o Latina/o Faculty and Staff Association Washington State University, 2001-2003

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Jairo Luis Rodriguez Acevedo

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Corinna Cisneros Washington State University

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Abstract

Relational  Development  as  a  Cornerstone  of  Success  in  Latino  STEM  Retention    Two  of  the  most  important  things  in  maintaining  and  increasing  minority  enrollment  in  STEM  disciplines  are  the  construction  of  relational  communities  of  support  for  students  outside  the  mainstream,  and  the  development  of  a  cohort  of  appropriate  mentors  for  these  students.    The  Team  Mentoring  Program  at  XXXXX  addresses  both  needs,  and  has  increased  the  retention  of  students  across  the  minority  spectrum  at  XXX.    However,  there  is  always  room  for  improvement.    One  of  the  areas  identified  for  research  was  to  understand  exactly  what  factors  –  both  cultural  and  relational  –  that  students  in  this  cohort  are  deficient  in  order  to  make  sure  that  the  TMP  addresses  these  directly.    Because  of  the  variability  in  backgrounds  of  students,  from  ethnic  heritage  to  social  class,  it  was  decided  to  research  Hispanic  students,  their  backgrounds,  and  their  understanding  of  various  relational  roles  and  attempt  to  correlate  these  with  student  success.    The  goal  is  to  identify  exactly  what  students  do  not  know  about  the  different  roles  of  support  services  in  university  life  (titles  like  ‘professor’,  ‘counselor’,  ‘advisor’)  and  match  these  back  to  the  level  of  relational  development  and  social  class  that  is  extant  in  their  backgrounds.    To  that  end,  the  above  researchers  are  doing  a  number  of  surveys  and  case  study  interviews  in  order  to  understand  primarily  a  group  of  students’  relational  sophistication,  and  match  this  with  their  background  before  they  attended  XXX,  as  well  as  gain  a  snapshot  of  how  tenure  at  XXX  affects  their  larger  understanding  of  these  roles  in  the  university.  

Hoyt, D. J., & Pezeshki, C., & Acevedo, J. M., & Rodriguez Acevedo, J. L., & Cisneros, C. (2014, June), Relational Development as a Cornerstone of Success in Latino STEM Retention Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. 10.18260/1-2--22969

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