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Relevant Education in Math and Science (REMS): K-12 STEM Outreach Program Using Industrial Engineering Applications

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Industrial Engineering Division Technical Session 2

Tagged Division

Industrial Engineering

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

26.1329.1 - 26.1329.13

DOI

10.18260/p.24666

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24666

Download Count

82

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Paper Authors

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Michael E. Kuhl Rochester Institute of Technology

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Michael E. Kuhl, PhD is a Professor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology. He earned his PhD in Industrial Engineering in 1997 from North Carolina State University. His research and teaching interests are in simulation, operations research, and decision analysis with a wide range of application areas including healthcare systems, project management, cyber security, and supply chain systems.

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John Kaemmerlen Rochester Institute of Technology (COE)

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John is a Senior Lecturer at RIT in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department, and is the Director of the Toyota Production Systems Laboratory. His areas of concentration are Lean, Production Systems, Facilities Planning, and Supply Chain Management. He also guides many of the capstone projects that RIT engineering students complete in the multidisciplinary senior design program. He has been at RIT for 7 years following 31 years at Eastman Kodak Co.

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Matthew Marshall Rochester Institute of Technology (COE)

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Matthew Marshall is an Associate Professor in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department at Rochester Institute of Technology. He received a Ph.D. in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan in 2002. He is director of the Human Performance Laboratory at RIT and his research interests include the biomechanics of sign language interpreting and the ergonomic design of consumer products.

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Jacqueline R. Mozrall Rochester Institute of Technology (COE)

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Dr. Jacqueline Mozrall is currently serving as Interim Dean of Saunders College of Business. Prior to joining the Saunders College as the Interim Dean, Dr. Mozrall served as Professor and Senior Associate Dean of the Kate Gleason College of Engineering. She worked closely with the Dean to assist in achieving college level goals, including diversifying the student body and faculty, supporting excellence in undergraduate and graduate education, fostering research and creating strong connections with employers and alumni. Jacquie has been a member of the management team for the Women in Engineering Program at RIT for more than 10 years. Since this time, there has been more than a tripling in the number of women in the entering class. She has been actively engaged in program assessment for more than 10 years, serving as a program evaluator and training mentor for the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). She is also executive director and principal investigator of a $420,000 Toyota USA foundation grant to support the development of in-lab and on-line activities linking K-12 STEM curriculum to real-world engineering problems.

Prior to becoming Associate Dean, Jacquie served as the Department Head of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISE) at RIT from 2000-2010. During her tenure as department head, she had the pleasure to work with a dedicated group of faculty and staff to further strengthen the department's reputation for excellence in undergraduate education while significantly increasing engagement in graduate education and research. Strong relationships with key industry partners and alumni were created, including the establishment of the Toyota Production Systems Lab.

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Jodi L. Carville Women in Engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology

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Jodi Carville is the Director of the Women in Engineering Program at RIT. She is responsible for the initiatives to inspire, educate, recruit, support and retain girls and women engineering students focused on engineering careers. She has a BS in Industrial Engineering and has worked with IBM and Kodak as an engineer and pursued a career in sales and marketing with both Kodak and Learning International. During her career sabbatical to raise her two boys, Jodi ran a successful direct sales business for 16 years; marketing children’s educational products that inspire learning. She recruited and trained women to be business owners and served as a speaker and trainer at conferences and events across the country. She serves on the RIT K-12 Advisory Board, is active with RIT Community and events, is President of the Society of Women Engineers Rochester Section, and enjoys long distance biking, travel, gardening, sporting events and family. https://rit.edu/women

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Abstract

Relevant Education for Math and Science (REMS): Engineering Applications of STEM Concepts for Grades 5-12Connecting math and science concepts to real-world applications can help to generate studentinterest in STEM disciplines and careers. In this research, we present the design, development,and assessment of a university-led outreach program to address this need. Relevant Education inMath and Science (REMS) is a program designed to use real-world problems to make math andscience fun and meaningful for students in grades 5–12. The goals of the REMS program are to:(a) create an effective math and science curriculum for grades 5–12 with a hands-on engineeringfocus; (b) increase the number of 5th – 12th grade math and science teachers using age-appropriate teaching modules linking math and science to real-world engineering challenges; and(c) increase the number of students who have access to fun, age-appropriate hands-on activitiesthat link math and science to real world problems.The curriculum is designed to provide students with an improved understanding and retention ofmathematical and scientific concepts through the use of relevant laboratory lessons based uponreal-world scenarios. On-line activities have also been developed that capture the essence of thein-lab laboratory experiences. These on-line interactive activities provide access to a broadnational audience of teachers and students.In this work, we present the current engineering lab activities which consist of in-lab and on-linemodules developed for three different activities in three different real-world contexts:competitive manufacturing, distribution, and healthcare. These modules are linked to curricularsubject standards found in math and science. Some of the activities include cycle time analysisand balancing of a skateboard assembly line; productivity analysis related to order picking,workstation design, and sorting of recyclable household items; and patient/workflow in ahealthcare system.In addition, we present the multi-phased design, development, and assessment process that wasutilized as well as results of over 1,300 surveys completed by students and teachers that haveparticipated in lab activities. Through participation in REMS activities, students can realizeimportant connections between math and science concepts and real-world problems to stimulatetheir curiosity and interest in STEM fields.

Kuhl, M. E., & Kaemmerlen, J., & Marshall, M., & Mozrall, J. R., & Carville, J. L. (2015, June), Relevant Education in Math and Science (REMS): K-12 STEM Outreach Program Using Industrial Engineering Applications Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24666

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