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Research Experience for Community College Students: Design and Optimization of Non-Volatile Latch using Anti-Fuse Memory Technology

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Conference

2019 Pacific Southwest Section Meeting

Location

California State University, Los Angeles , California

Publication Date

April 4, 2019

Start Date

April 4, 2019

End Date

April 6, 2019

Conference Session

PSW Section Meeting Papers - Disregard start and end time - for online paper access only

Tagged Topics

Diversity and Pacific Southwest Section Meeting Paper Submissions

Page Count

15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31841

Download Count

56

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Paper Authors

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Michael Gee Canada College

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I'm a third year Mechanical Engineer major at Canada Community College and I plan to transfer to a CSU or UC in the Fall of 2019.

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Anthony Akash Lal

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Alex E Hercules

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Tyler Sheaves San Francisco State University

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A graduate researcher at San Francisco State University's Nano Electronics and Computing Research Lab (NeCRL). He has assisted in multiple projects involving hardware and IP security, typically focusing research efforts on development and automation of complex integrated circuit workflows and low-level device architecture. Each Summer since joining NeCRL, he has assisted in the ASPIRES Summer bridge program which aims to assist first-generation college students, in underrepresented groups, studying STEM fields, transition from community colleges into research roles at four-year universities. Tyler has been a researcher at NeCRL since 2016 and will be graduating with a Masters in Embedded Electrical and Computer Systems in Fall of 2019.

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Amelito G Enriquez Canada College Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-1259-0680

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Amelito Enriquez is a professor of Engineering and Mathematics at Cañada College in Redwood City, CA. He received a BS in Geodetic Engineering from the University of the Philippines, his MS in Geodetic Science from the Ohio State University, and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Irvine. His research interests include technology-enhanced instruction and increasing the representation of female, minority and other underrepresented groups in mathematics, science and engineering.

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Cheng Chen San Francisco State University

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Dr. Cheng Chen is currently an associate professor in the school of engineering at San Francisco State University. His research interests include earthquake engineering, structural reliability and fire structural engineering.

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Hao Jiang San Francisco State University

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Hao Jiang received the B.S. degree in materials sciences from Tsinghua University, China, in 1994 and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of California, San Diego, in 2000.

Hao Jiang has been with San Francisco State University since August 2007 as an assistant professor in electrical engineering. Prior joining SFSU, he worked for Broadcom Corporation, Jazz Semiconductor and Conexant Systems Inc. His research interests are in the general area of analog integrated circuits, particularly in ultra-low-power circuits for biomedical applications.

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Zhaoshuo Jiang P.E. San Francisco State University

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Zhaoshuo Jiang graduated from the University of Connecticut with a Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering. Before joining San Francisco State University as an assistant professor, he worked as a structural engineering professional at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) LLP. As a licensed professional engineer in the states of Connecticut and California, Dr. Jiang has been involved in the design of a variety of low-rise and high-rise projects. His current research interests mainly focus on Smart Structures Technology, Structural Control and Health Monitoring and Innovative Engineering Education.

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Wenshen Pong P.E. San Francisco State University

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Wenshen Pong received his Ph.D. in Structural Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He joined the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University in 1998. He teaches courses in Civil/Structural Engineering.

Dr. Pong is a registered Professional Engineer in California. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Structural Engineers Association of California. He has published over fifty technical papers in the areas of Structural Control and Earthquake Engineering. Dr. Pong was the Director of the School of Engineering at SFSU with 20 full-time faculty and over 25 part-time faculty from 2009 to 2018.

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Xiaorong Zhang San Francisco State University

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Xiaorong Zhang received the B.S. degree in computer science from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, in 2006, the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in computer engineering from University of Rhode Island, Kingston, in 2009 and 2013 respectively. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. Her research interests include embedded systems, wearable technologies, neural-machine interface, and cyber-physical systems.

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Hamid Mahmoodi San Francisco State University

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Hamid Mahmoodi received his Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 2005. He is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. His research interests include low-power, reliable, and high-performance circuit design in nano-electronic technologies. He has published more than one hundred technical papers in journals and conferences and holds five U.S. patents. He was a co-recipient of the 2008 SRC Inventor Recognition Award, the 2006 IEEE Circuits and Systems Society VLSI Transactions Best Paper Award, 2005 SRC Technical Excellence Award, and the Best Paper Award of the 2004 International Conference on Computer Design. He has served on technical program committees of Custom Integrated Circuits Conference, International Symposium on Low Power Electronics Design, and International Symposium on Quality Electronics Design.

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Abstract

A ten-week summer research internship program is designed and implemented for community college students. The research activity is performed in a four-year university under the guidance of a faculty in charge of the research program, and the research interns are assigned a graduate student mentor. The results of this program include research experience given to the community college students early in their educational pathways. Such early exposure to research has benefits of improved students’ outlooks which improve their performance in their coursework and sharpen their interest in pursuing STEM fields. Given the often-lengthy background preparation needed for conducting research, it is difficult to incorporate research experience as a curricular activity in regular semesters when students have a lot of distractions managing various assignments in different courses. Summer is a time when students have fewer distractions and can be effectively engaged in a focused research activity. The intern cohort are divided to discipline of Electrical, Computer, Mechanical, and Civil Engineering. This paper presents the details of the project for the Electrical Engineering cohort, the research, and educational objectives, results obtained. The planned research project for the Electrical cohort is related to anti-fuse memory technology, which is a promising one-time programmable nano-scale technology for information storage. In this technology, the information is stored in a resistive form which is a state of a fuse element that is non-volatile. In this research, we propose a unique application for anti-fuse memory technology and that is to realize non-volatile single-bit latch element that can be used for building re configurable logic circuits. The entire intern cohort are surveyed at the end of the program to assesses the program outcomes. According to the student surveys, the results suggest that research experience is very valuable in encouraging students to pursue STEM research careers. Moreover, this experience enhances students’ technical research skills such as scientific thinking, ability to analyze and interpret results, and presentation skills. This flipped approach to educational pathways in which research experience is offered early on results in students to be more determined and motivated as they progress through their educational pathways.

Gee, M., & Lal, A. A., & Hercules, A. E., & Sheaves, T., & Enriquez, A. G., & Chen, C., & Jiang, H., & Jiang, Z., & Pong, W., & Zhang, X., & Mahmoodi, H. (2019, April), Research Experience for Community College Students: Design and Optimization of Non-Volatile Latch using Anti-Fuse Memory Technology Paper presented at 2019 Pacific Southwest Section Meeting, California State University, Los Angeles , California. https://peer.asee.org/31841

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