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Results from Implementation and Assessment of Case Studies in the Engineering Curriculum

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Conference

2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Atlanta, Georgia

Publication Date

June 23, 2013

Start Date

June 23, 2013

End Date

June 26, 2013

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees' Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

23.1044.1 - 23.1044.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22429

Download Count

22

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Paper Authors

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Norb Delatte P.E. Cleveland State University

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Dr. Norbert J. Delatte, Jr., P.E., is professor and chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cleveland State University. He received his B.S. in Civil Engineering from The Citadel in 1984, a master's degree in Civil Engineering from The Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1986, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from The University of Texas at Austin in 1996.
He served for eleven years in the United States Army as an officer in the Corps of Engineers, including two years of service in the Republic of Korea, wartime service in the Arabian Peninsula during Operation Desert Storm, and command of an engineer company during Hurricane Andrew relief operations in southern Florida. He taught as an assistant professor at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York during the 1996-1997 academic year.
Dr. Delatte is the author of Beyond Failure: Forensic Case Studies for Civil Engineers (ASCE Press, 2009). He is the former chair of the ASCE Technical Council on Forensic Engineering (TCFE) Executive Committee and the TCFE Education Committee. In addition, he is the editor of ASCE’s Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education and Practice. Dr. Delatte is a registered professional engineer in the States of Ohio and Alabama and in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

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Joshua Gisemba Bagaka's Cleveland State University

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Dr. Joshua Gisemba Bagaka's is a professor of educational research design and statistics in the Department of Curriculum and Foundations in the College of Education and Human Services at Cleveland State University. He received his Bachelor of Education degree in Mathematics Education from the University of Nairobi, a Master’s of Science in Probabilities and Statistics and a Ph.D. in Educational Research Design and Statistics both from Michigan State University. His research interests are in the utilization of hierarchical linear models in analyzing school, teacher, and classroom effects on student learning outcomes. Dr. Bagaka’s has also been involved in studies utilizing hierarchical linear modeling to identify the value-added indicators of school and teacher effectiveness on student achievement. His recent work on the role of teacher characteristics and practices on upper secondary school students’ mathematics self-efficacy was published in the International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education. Dr. Bagaka’s is a recent African Regional Research Fulbright Program scholar to Kenya where he conducted research on teacher beliefs and practices on high school mathematics self-efficacy.

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Matthew W Roberts University of Wisconsin, Platteville

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Dr. Matthew Roberts is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental
Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville (UWP). He earned his B.S. in Civil Engineering from Brigham Young University then spent four years in the U.S. Air Force as a civil engineering officer. He received his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in 2002 and has been teaching structural engineering topics at UWP since then.

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Rebecca A Atadero Colorado State University

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Manoochehr Zoghi P.E. California State University, Fresno

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Dr. Manoochehr Zoghi, a registered professional engineer, is the associate dean and professor in the Lyles College of Engineering at California State University, Fresno. He received his B.S. and M.Eng degrees in Civil Engineering from University of Louisville and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from University of Cincinnati. He is an ABET program evaluator (PEV) and is a Coleman Fellow for Entrepreneurship.

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Philip W. Johnson University of Alabama

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During his career Dr. Johnson has done research and published on: high-speed centrifuges, advanced materials, turbo machinery, heat transfer, cuttings transport in drilling, using air as a drilling fluid, coal permeability, mine ventilation, multiphase & transient flow in porous media, remediation of oily soils, carbon sequestration, water-jet drilling, highway warranties, lightweight fill, construction change orders, and engineering education.
His current projects include: construction change orders, rapid testing of water for potability, and the role of management in engineering failures.
During his university career Dr. Johnson has taught 25 different graduate and undergraduate courses.
His current interests include Forensic Engineering, Engineering Service Learning, and Civil Engineering Materials. Dr. Johnson is also a noted educator of professionals, having presented over 50 weeks of training in over 20 countries worldwide.

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Tara L. Cavalline University of North Carolina at Charlotte

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Dr. Tara L Cavalline, P.E. is an assistant professor of Civil Engineering Technology at UNC Charlotte. She holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Civil Engineering from The Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. in Infrastructure and Environmental Systems from UNC Charlotte. She is a registered professional engineer in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Pennsylvania.

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Michael K Thompson University of Wisconsin, Platteville

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Dr. M. Keith Thompson is currently an associate professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville. Dr. Thompson received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees from The University of Texas in Austin and his B.S. degree from North Carolina State University. He is a member of ASEE, ASCE, and ACI. His research interests include reinforced concrete design, civil engineering curriculum reform, student retention, and advising. He is currently working on research related to integration of infrastructure issues into the civil engineering curriculum and the use of data analytics to improve student retention.

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Abstract

Results from Implementation and Assessment of Case Studies in the Engineering Curriculum Lessons learned from case studies have had a significant impact on both education andpractice of engineering and related disciplines. The history of practice in many engineeringdisciplines is, in large part, the story of failures, both imminent and actual, and ensuing changesto designs, standards and procedures made as the result of timely interventions or forensicanalyses. In addition to technical issues, professional and ethical responsibilities are highlightedby the relevant cases. Pilot studies assessed use of failure case studies in civil engineering andengineering mechanics courses at University X under an earlier NSF project. Student learning was assessed through surveys and focus group discussions. Studentswere asked specifically about the technical lessons learned, as well as their response to the casestudies. Case study questions were included on homework assignments and examinations.Survey questions linked student achievement to learning outcomes. Over the past few years the project extended the work of implementing and assessingcase studies from University X to eleven other university partners, and broadened the scope tocover all engineering disciplines, as well as the NSF Materials Digital Library. This paperreports on the results from including case studies in various courses at a diverse data set ofuniversities. The results strongly suggest that failure case studies support a subset of ABEToutcomes that may be referred to as the “Professional Component” of the curriculum. TheProfessional Component outcomes include understanding of professional and ethicalresponsibility, understanding the impact of engineering solution, life-long learning, andknowledge of contemporary issues.

Delatte, N., & Bagaka's, J. G., & Roberts, M. W., & Atadero, R. A., & Zoghi, M., & Johnson, P. W., & Cavalline, T. L., & Thompson, M. K. (2013, June), Results from Implementation and Assessment of Case Studies in the Engineering Curriculum Paper presented at 2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia. https://peer.asee.org/22429

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