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Road To Nano Technology Education In Engineering Technology: An Area Of Interdisciplinary Studies

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Interdisciplinary Education in Engineering Technology

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

12.1250.1 - 12.1250.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2088

Download Count

52

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Paper Authors

biography

Jinwen Zhu Missouri Western State University

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JINWEN ZHU, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Electronics/Computer Engineering Technology at Missouri Western State University. He joined the faculty at Missouri Western State University in August 2005, after completing his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and M.S. in Computer Science at the University of North Carolina. He teaches a variety of courses for the Department of Engineering Technology at Missouri Western State University.

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biography

Virendra Varma Missouri Western State University

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VIRENDRA VARMA, Ph.D., P.E., F. ASCE, is Professor and Chairman, Department of Engineering Technology at Missouri Western State University.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Road to Nano-Technology Education in Engineering Technology: An Area of Interdisciplinary Studies

Abstract

“Nano-scale science and engineering most likely will produce the strategic technology breakthroughs of tomorrow,” says David Swain, Senior Vice President of Engineering and Technology at Boeing. The development of micro-scale engineering in the area of electronics and computer technology demonstrates low cost and high efficiency technology advancements in miniaturization. These efforts have led to the emergence of nanotechnology dealing with a wide range of engineering applications at the nano scale. Nanotechnology has future impacts in the application markets such as medicine, healthcare, biotechnology, communications, and electronics. Due to rapid development and broad impact of nanotechnology, education and training of a new generation of workforce skilled in this field will play an important role in the development and applications of nanotechnology. It is a challenge for educators, especially for engineering technology educators, to provide an appropriate curriculum and effective learning environment including state-of-the-art laboratories for students who want to enter the nano field after their graduation. This paper will discuss the objectives of nano-technology education in the field of engineering technology at the baccalaureate level and point to the key issue of the interdisciplinary nature of nanotechnology. An analysis is made of the demands for laboratory facilities, faculty, and functions of other service departments to deliver an engineering technology curriculum in nanotechnology. Guidelines are provided for an innovative curriculum that draws upon collaborations among faculty, departments, and laboratories. The suggested guidelines can be modified to address the evolving needs of nano-technology education without loss of focus on engineering technology education.

Introduction

In 1959, Richard Feyman set the stage for research at the nano scale. Since then, the development of micro-scale engineering in the area of electronics and computer engineering has demonstrated low cost, and high efficiency technology advancements in miniaturization. These efforts have led to the emergence of nanotechnology dealing with a wide range of engineering applications at the nano scale. During the last two decades, there have been many advances in research, development, and commercialization of nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is concerned with the design, characterization, and fabrication of new materials, devices, and systems on the nanometer scale, with their properties dramatically improved from their bulk counterpart. Nanotechnology converge several disciplines including physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering, and covers the use of quantum effects, synthesis and processing of nanoparticles, self-assembly of nanostructure, fabrication of nanostructure and devices including chemical and biological sensors. Nanoscale science and technology impact application markets such as medicine, healthcare, biotechnology, communications, electronics, etc. Realizing the potential impact of nanotechnology on science and technology and economy, all industrialized nations and some developing countries have developed a national strategy for developing nanotechnology ranging from a general science research strategy to applications-motivated strategy. This has

Zhu, J., & Varma, V. (2007, June), Road To Nano Technology Education In Engineering Technology: An Area Of Interdisciplinary Studies Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2088

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