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Robotics in the Core Science Classroom: Benefits and Challenges for Curriculum Development and Implementation (RTP, Strand 4)

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Research to Practice: STRAND 4 – K-12 Engineering Resources: Best Practices in Curriculum Design (Part 1)

Tagged Division

K-12 & Pre-College Engineering

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

26.1349.1 - 26.1349.16

DOI

10.18260/p.24686

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24686

Download Count

106

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Paper Authors

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Marion Usselman Georgia Institute of Technology

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Marion Usselman is a Principal Research Scientist and Associate Director for Federal Outreach and Research at the Georgia Institute of Technology's Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics and Computing (CEISMC). She earned her Ph.D. in Biophysics from the Johns Hopkins University and has been with CEISMC since 1996 developing and managing university-K-12 educational partnership programs. She currently leads up a team of educators and educational researchers who are exploring how to integrate science, mathematics and engineering within authentic school contexts and researching the nature of the resultant student learning

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Mike Ryan Georgia Institute of Technology

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Mike Ryan is research faculty at the Georgia Institute of Technology's Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics and Computing (CEISMC). Mike has expertise in the design and use of project-based learning (PBL) to facilitate standards-based learning.

- Mike is the Co-PI for the NSF-funded project Science Learning Integrating Design, Engineering and Robotics (SLIDER), overseeing curriculum design, teacher learning and research strategy. The project investigates the integration of engineering in science classes to facilitate physics learning.

- Mike is senior personnel for another NSF project, AMP-IT-UP, that is studying STEM integration. He designs curriculum, PD, and strategy for the project.

- Mike is active in designing and researching online learning courses in PBL for educators. Mike has also previously taught secondary science in public schools.

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Jeffrey H Rosen Georgia Institute of Technology

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After 14 years in the middle and high school math and engineering classroom where Mr. Rosen was working on the integration of engineering and robotics into the teaching of the core curricula classrooms. He has now been at Georgia Tech's CEISMC for the past 8 years working on curriculum development and research on authentic STEM instruction and directing the state's FIRST LEGO League competition program. Mr. Rosen has authored or co-authored papers and book chapters that address issues of underrepresented populations participation in engineering programs and the integration of robotics and engineering into classroom instruction.

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Jayma Koval Georgia Institute of Technology

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Jayma Koval is a Teacher in Residence at Georgia Tech’s Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics and Computing (CEISMC). In this role she has developed middle school science curriculum and assessments for NSF funded projects. Previously, Jayma was a middle school science teacher for 10 years and coordinator of her school’s Science Olympiad team.

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Sabrina Grossman CEISMC: Georgia Tech

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I am currently a Program Director in Science Education at Georgia Tech's Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing (CEISMC), which is a K-12 STEM outreach center for the university. I am working on several exciting projects including working with the STEM Incubator as Problem Based Learning Specialist and teaching an online course in Project-Based Inquiry Learning. I also work on the SLIDER team developing curriculum to teach physical science with robotics and designing teacher materials to support the implementation of that curriculum. Lastly, I work on the AMP-IT-UP project, which is a NSF Foundation Math and Science Partnership to promote workforce development and to identify and cultivate the next generation of creative STEM innovators. Through my participation in this project, I assist in writing middle school science modules and supporting teachers in their implementation.

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Nancy Anna Newsome CEISMC - Georgia Tech

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Anna Newsome serves as an Educational Outreach Manager at Georgia Tech for two research projects funded by the Nation Science Foundation. She received a Bachelor of Science in Public Policy from Georgia Tech in 2008. After graduation Anna spent a year working for a private sector event firm before eagerly returning to her alma mater and joining the Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing in January 2010. Anna completed a Master of Science in Educational Research with a concentration in Research, Measurement, and Statistics from Georgia State University in May 2013.

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Marcela Nicole Moreno CEISMC

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Marcela Moreno is an Educational Outreach Coordinator for three National Science Foundation projects, SLIDER (Science Learning Integrating Design, Engineering and Robotics), AMP-IT-UP (Advanced Manufacturing & Prototyping Integrated to Unlock Potential) and Earsketch: An Authentic, Studio-Based STEAM Approach to High School Computing Education. She is also a coordinator for GoSTEM- a collaboration between Georgia Tech and Gwinnett County Public Schools. She graduated from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2013 with a Bachelor of Science in History, Technology and Society with a minor in International Affairs. During her undergraduate career, she interned with CEISMC's summer programs division for three years before moving into her current position. She is currently working toward her Master in City and Regional Planning at Georgia Tech with a focus on environmental and health planning. She coordinates events, purchasing, and payments for her four projects.

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Abstract

Robotics  in  the  Core  Science  Classroom:       Benefits  and  Challenges  for  Curriculum  Development  and   Implementation  (RTP,  Strand  4)      The  (****)  project  at  the  University  of  (***)  is  in  the  5th  year  of  developing  and  implementing  an  inquiry  and  project-­‐based  learning  curriculum  that  is  aligned  with  NGSS  and  designed  to  teach  middle  school  physical  science  disciplinary  content  and  practices  using  LEGO  Mindstorm  NXT  as  the  engineering  manipulative.    Using  Design-­‐Based  Implementation  Research  (DBIR)  methods,  the  team  has  documented  the  curriculum  design  decisions  that  resulted  from  iterative  cycles  of  A)  design  and  creation  of  materials,  B)  teacher  professional  learning  sessions,  C)  enactment  by  teachers  in  8th  grade  classrooms,  D)  observation  and  data  collection,  and  E)  problem  redefinition  and  curriculum  redesign.      These  activities  took  place  in  a  diverse  set  of  schools,  ranging  from  a  low-­‐income  but  fairly  stable  rural  school,  to  a  suburban  school  with  a  rapidly  changing  demographic  population  and  high  student  turnover,  to  a  stable  and  high  performing  affluent  school.        This  paper  will  focus  on  the  benefits  and  challenges  of  using  robotics,  in  this  case  LEGO  Mindstorm  NXT  kits,  as  a  manipulative  to  teach  science  content  within  the  core  science  classroom,  particularly  within  less-­‐than-­‐optimal,  but  very  common,  types  of  school  settings.    It  will  cover  the  issues  of  materials  management  and  constraints,  resource  and  time  requirements  in  different  settings,  variability  in  student  prior  knowledge,  and  the  necessary  scaffolding  of  robotic-­‐based  activities  to  ensure  that  students  focus  adequately  on  science  content.      Data  sources  include  design  reflections  and  documentation,  classroom  observations,  project  communications,  teacher  surveys  and  interviews,  and  teacher  reports  of  curriculum  enactment.  

Usselman, M., & Ryan, M., & Rosen, J. H., & Koval, J., & Grossman, S., & Newsome, N. A., & Moreno, M. N. (2015, June), Robotics in the Core Science Classroom: Benefits and Challenges for Curriculum Development and Implementation (RTP, Strand 4) Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24686

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