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Screencasts for Enhancing Chemical Engineering Education

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Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees’ Poster Session

Tagged Division

Division Experimentation & Lab-Oriented Studies

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

24.1073.1 - 24.1073.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/23006

Download Count

62

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Paper Authors

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Garret Nicodemus University of Colorado, Boulder

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Senior researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. Received PhD in Chemical & Biological Engineering at CU Boulder in 2009 and B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Lafayette College in 2004. Has taught Material & Energy Balances, Fluid Mechanics, Separations and Mass Transfer, and Senior Process Design.

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John L. Falconer University of Colorado Boulder

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John L. Falconer is the Mel and Virginia Clark Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and a President's Teaching Scholar at the University of Colorado Boulder. He has published more than 225 papers and has 12 patents in the areas of zeolite membranes, heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, and atomic and molecular deposition. He has directed the effort at the University of Colorado to prepare screencasts, ConcepTests, and interactive simulations for chemical engineering courses (www.LearnChemE.com).

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Will Medlin University of Colorado, Boulder

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J. Will Medlin is an associate professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and the ConocoPhillips Faculty Fellow at the University of Colorado. He teaches courses in kinetics, thermodynamics, and material and energy balances. His research interests are in the area of surface science and heterogeneous catalysis.

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Katherine Page McDanel Dept Chemical & Biological Engineering University of Colorado Boulder

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Janet L. de Grazia University of Colorado, Boulder

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James K. Ferri Lafayette College

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James K. Ferri is the James T. Markus '50 and Head of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Lafayette College.

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Christopher R. Anderson Lafayette College

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Chris Anderson is an Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Lafayette College. He was previously at The College of New Jersey, where he helped found the Biomedical Engineering Department, developed courses in medical imaging, drug delivery, biotransport, and mentored related senior design projects. He led product development at Targeson, Inc., a start-up company where he developed targeted contrast agents for ultrasound imaging of tumor growth. He earned his and M.S. and Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from the University of Virginia, where his research focused on the molecular mechanisms of blood vessel growth, and he earned his B.S. in chemical engineering from Bucknell University.

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Michael Senra Lafayette College

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Abstract

Screencasts for Enhancing Chemical Engineering EducationChemical & biological engineering faculty have developed over 950 screencasts covering topicsin chemical engineering courses. Screencasts are short videos (typically less than 10 minutes)with narration and are made by digital capture of a tablet PC screen. Screencasts can introduce atopic, solve an example problem, explain a concept, explain a diagram and process, demonstratesoftware use, review for an exam, or present a mini-lecture. They can be used in combinationwith textbooks, online reading quizzes, homework assignments, and office hours. They can alsobe used to create flipped classrooms, where students work under the supervision of the instructorduring class and information delivery is outside of class. Their brevity is an important attributethat distinguishes them from video lectures, and they have significant advantages thatsupplement textbooks and written materials, such as step by step visual explanations of adiagram or series of plots. This personalized method of learning empowers students by givingthem control over the rate of information delivery and when they receive information. As ofOctober 2013, these videos had been watched/downloaded over 2.7 million times and have anoverwhelmingly positive response from students in our classes and through YouTube comments.Building off of this success, our second phase goals include creating 800 more screencasts todevelop over 12 comprehensive chemical engineering courses. Each library of screencasts willbe validated by chemical engineering faculty around the country. We also will be assessing theireffectiveness on improving student learning gains and attitudes. Previous research shows thatscreencasts help minimize cognitive overload, increase student confidence, and allow students totake control of their learning. This allows faculty to use class time for active-learningapproaches, which are more effective than lectures. Thus, the overall effect will be to improveundergraduate chemical engineering education, provide a model for other engineeringdisciplines, and better prepare engineering students for the future.We will provide information on accessing these resources as well as share our insight and bestpractices for other faculty interested in developing their own screencasts. Assessment datacollected from multiple courses and institutions will focus on qualitative student and facultyfeedback. Initial findings related to quantitative learning gains and student attitudes will also bepresented.

Nicodemus, G., & Falconer, J. L., & Medlin, W., & McDanel, K. P., & de Grazia, J. L., & Ferri, J. K., & Anderson, C. R., & Senra, M. (2014, June), Screencasts for Enhancing Chemical Engineering Education Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. https://peer.asee.org/23006

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2014 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015