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Service Learning Approaches To International Humanitarian Design Projects: A Model Based On The Experiences Of Faith Based Institutions

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Conference

2004 Annual Conference

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 20, 2004

Start Date

June 20, 2004

End Date

June 23, 2004

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Design for Community

Page Count

22

Page Numbers

9.1091.1 - 9.1091.22

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12701

Download Count

158

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Paper Authors

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Nolan Van Gaalen

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Kristin Wood

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Carl Erikson

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Frank Duda

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Matthew Green

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Steven VanderLeest

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2625

Service-Learning Approaches to International Humanitarian Design Projects: A Model Based on Experiences of Faith-Based Institutions

Matthew G. Green and Kristin L. Wood Steven H. VanderLeest Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Department of Engineering, Calvin College The University of Texas, Austin Grand Rapids, MI matthew-green@mail.utexas.edu svleest@calvin.edu Frank T. Duda Carl Erikson Department of Engineering, Grove City College Department of Engineering, Messiah College Grove City, PA Grantham, PA ftduda@gcc.edu erikson@messiah.edu Nolan Van Gaalen Department of Engineering, Dordt College Sioux Center, IA nolan@dordt.edu

Abstract Recent curriculum advancements in engineering education highlight the value of a healthy synergy from including applied mathematics and science, industrial work, and need-based projects. In light of the growing interest in globalizing engineering education, a service-learning approach to globally-based humanitarian projects is an effective approach to help in achieving this balance. The importance of integrating both globalization and social needs into the engineering curriculum is acknowledged by the ABET criteria. Human need is also a clear priority of engineering as a profession and of major world religions. It is not surprising, therefore, that faith-based institutions place a high value on such projects. This paper presents the methods and conclusions of design projects from four faith-based institutions that exemplify the successful integration of both globalization and humanitarian interests. The presentation focus is a model for conducting such projects. Particular results, within the context of these projects, include specific characteristics and insights for designing, selecting, and executing international humanitarian design projects within the undergraduate engineering curriculum.

Introduction Engineering educators are increasingly recognizing the value of exposing students to need-based engineering problems and pedagogies [1, 2, 3, 4]. Another area of growing interest is the globalization of engineering education [5, 6, 7, 8]. These important topics may be concurrently addressed with a service-learning approach by involving students in international humanitarian (IH) design projects [9, 10, 11]. This approach addresses key ABET criteria by integrating both globalization and social needs into the engineering curriculum. Additionally, social needs are a clear priority of engineering as a profession (as indicated in the NSPE creedi) and of major world religions (as indicated by their international outreach). It is not surprising, therefore, that

i “As a Professional Engineer, I dedicate my professional knowledge and skill to the advancement and betterment of human welfare …” (NSPE Code of Ethics for Engineers)

Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2004, American Society for Engineering Education

Van Gaalen, N., & Wood, K., & Erikson, C., & Duda, F., & Green, M., & VanderLeest, S. (2004, June), Service Learning Approaches To International Humanitarian Design Projects: A Model Based On The Experiences Of Faith Based Institutions Paper presented at 2004 Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/12701

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