Asee peer logo

Service Learning In Core Courses Throughout A Mechanical Engineering Curriculum

Download Paper |

Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Improving ME Education: Trends in Mechanical Engineering I

Tagged Division

Mechanical Engineering

Page Count

41

Page Numbers

12.1274.1 - 12.1274.41

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2882

Download Count

39

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

John Duffy University of Massachusetts-Lowell

visit author page

Professor of Mechanical and Solar Engineering. Faculty Coordinator of SLICE Program (Service-Learning Integrated throughout a College of Engineering), Coordinator of the Graduate Program in Solar Engineering, and Director of the Center for Sustainable Energy.

visit author page

biography

Linda Barrington University of Massachusetts-Lowell

visit author page

Service-Learning Coordinator for the Francis College of Engineering. She is a second career Mechanical Engineer, with over twenty years of human services management. She assists faculty in all five engineering departments to develop course-based service-learning projecs to meet real community needs.

visit author page

biography

Cheryl West University of Massachusetts-Lowell

visit author page

Program Manager of numerous community-university projects. Work Environment Ph.D. candidate with major emphasis on work and environmental policy with minors in cleaner production/ pollution prevention and epidemiology. MS in community psychology.

visit author page

biography

John McKelliget University of Massachusetts-Lowell

visit author page

Professor and Chairperson, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Received his Ph.D. in 1980 in the UK, then was a Visiting Scientist at MIT, and has been at UML since 1984. He is a Senior Member of IEEE, a Member of ASME, and has been involved in the numerical simulation of thermal plasma systems for more than 25 years.

visit author page

biography

Eugene Niemi University of Massachusetts-Lowell

visit author page

Professor, Mechanical Engineering. Dr. Niemi has taught at the University for 40 years. His industrial experience is in steam turbine and missile design. He currently teaches courses in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and aerodynamics. He is a registered professional engineer.

visit author page

biography

Sammy Shina University of Massachusetts-Lowell

visit author page

Professor of Mechanical Engineering.

visit author page

biography

Hongwei Sun University of Massachusetts-Lowell

visit author page

Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineeering Department.

visit author page

biography

Chris Niezrecki University of Massachusetts-Lowell

visit author page

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering.

visit author page

biography

Robert Parkin University of Massachusetts-Lowell

visit author page

Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering.

visit author page

biography

Majid Charmchi University of Massachusetts-Lowell

visit author page

Professor, Mechanical Engineering. Director of the Heat Transfer Laboratory.

visit author page

biography

Peter Avitabile University of Massachusetts Lowell

visit author page

Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department and the Director of the Modal Analysis and Controls Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. He is a Registered Professional Engineer with a BS, MS and Doctorate in Mechanical Engineering and a member of ASEE, ASME and SEM.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Service-Learning in Core Courses throughout a Mechanical Engineering Curriculum Abstract

Service-Learning (S-L) has been shown to be effective on a large number of cognitive and affective measures for college students. S-L is a pedagogy in which student learning objectives and real community needs are met in a credit-bearing course. In engineering the integration of S-L into any courses, much less existing core courses in a curriculum does not match the penetration in other disciplines. The Mechanical Engineering (ME) Department at the University of Massachusetts Lowell has incorporated S-L projects into core courses so that every student has at least one required core course every semester with a S-L project that is either a required or elective part of the course. During 2005-06 fourteen core ME courses had S-L projects, and a required engineering ethics course also had S-L in addition to four elective courses. Nine of twelve ME faculty members incorporated S-L in those courses (more recently 12 of 13), in addition to 3 faculty outside the department teaching courses for ME students. This initiative is part of a college-wide effort to have all five undergraduate programs have S-L integrated into the core curriculum (ECE, ChE, CE, and Plastics E).

Courses and projects included, for examples, introduction to engineering for first year students (common to students in all five programs) who designed and built educational displays for the local national historic park, sophomore design lab with device development for student relatives or friends with disabilities, a dynamics course with safety analysis of many local playgrounds, a convective process course with the design of a water supply system for a village in a developing country, a statics course with a water tower design for another village (with the later two systems actually constructed in the villages the college has “adopted”), a machine elements course with four different S-L miniprojects, a ME laboratory course with the design of a measurement system to test local playground surface hardness, a heat transfer course with the analysis of energy efficiency of college classrooms, and finally several capstone course projects including a FIRST robot design/built with high school students, systems for remote villages, and an assistive technology device. In total 366 student-course projects were completed, ranging from extra credit to 100% of the course.

Assessment tools included several college-wide surveys and interviews of faculty, students, and community partners and student reports and presentations. The ME undergraduate student surveys from spring 2006 totaled 89 and do not include first year students because of the common courses. The average number of S-L courses taken was 2.4. To statements that S-L helped increase interest in learning, increase commitment to the community, improved writing and speaking skills, leadership ability, personal ability to “make a difference,” value of teamwork (among others) students recorded a range of agreement to non-agreement on a 1-9 point Likert scale. The averages were all 6 or above, disagreement ranged from 7 % to 14% and agreement from 60 to 75%. Most

Duffy, J., & Barrington, L., & West, C., & McKelliget, J., & Niemi, E., & Shina, S., & Sun, H., & Niezrecki, C., & Parkin, R., & Charmchi, M., & Avitabile, P. (2007, June), Service Learning In Core Courses Throughout A Mechanical Engineering Curriculum Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2882

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2007 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015