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Simulation And Animation Of Engineering Systems: No Specialized Software Or Programming Required

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Computed Simulation and Animation

Tagged Division

Computers in Education

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

12.1278.1 - 12.1278.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2673

Download Count

59

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Paper Authors

biography

William Ziegler State University of New York-Binghamton

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William Ziegler is an Associate Professor in the Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Faculty Master of Newing College, at the State University of New York - Binghamton University.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Simulation and Animation of Engineering Systems: No Specialized Software or Programming Required Abstract:

Many topics in engineering curricula rely on visual components to help convey concepts that are difficult to describe in purely text-based form. Similarly, raw data plotted in a colorful three- dimensional graph brings life to otherwise static numerical information. The extraordinary value of providing a visual component to teaching and learning is well documented. Adding animation to visual components only serves to enhance the learning experience even further. The use of animation allows students to view dynamic processes in various topics throughout all engineering disciplines in a manner that effectively engages the student in the learning process. However, the task of creating simulations and animations is frequently a daunting, time- consuming task where regardless of the usefulness there is simply not enough time in a day to create such a worthwhile experience for students. Therefore, providing instructors with the capability to create, with ease, animations of complex engineering systems and providing students with the opportunity to view these “living” systems is invaluable in the quest to enhance teaching and learning and to retain student interest in the subject matter.

This paper will provide a discussion centered on two intertwined themes. The first theme provides details regarding useful techniques for creating animation of dynamic processes applicable across all engineering disciplines, without the use of programming or specialized software. The second theme is the development of an example of animating the architecture of a computer system. This analytical example evolves from a course in digital systems, and actively demonstrates the physical interrelationships of individual components of a computer system as a program executes in real-time, clock-pulse by clock-pulse. This simulation/animation provides an effective opportunity for students to visualize the movement of data throughout the architecture of the system as a program executes in either a continuous or stop-and-go fashion at a speed determined by the analytical capabilities of the student user of the system. Even though the example is from the topic of digital systems, the explanation of the simulation/animation techniques is presented in a manner that is applicable across all engineering disciplines.

Introduction:

Engineering students are typically hands-on visually oriented learners. The extraordinary value of providing a visual component to teaching and learning is well documented. Many topics in engineering curricula rely on visual components to help convey concepts that are difficult to describe in purely text-based form. Adding animation to visual components only serves to enhance the learning experience even further. Bringing animation to raw data plotted in a colorful three-dimensional graph brings life to otherwise static numerical information.

Simulation and animation can be utilized by an instructor to illustrate concepts in a classroom setting or by students to solve problems in a laboratory setting. The use of animation provides a method to model and observe dynamic processes in all engineering disciplines in a manner that effectively engages the observer.

Ziegler, W. (2007, June), Simulation And Animation Of Engineering Systems: No Specialized Software Or Programming Required Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2673

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