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Smarter Teamwork: System For The Management, Assessment, Research, Training, Education, And Remediation Of Teamwork

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

15.1069.1 - 15.1069.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/16605

Download Count

16

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Paper Authors

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Matthew Ohland Purdue University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4052-1452

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Matthew W. Ohland is an Associate Professor in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University and is the Past President of Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society. He received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Florida in 1996. Previously, he served as Assistant Director of the NSF-sponsored SUCCEED Engineering Education Coalition. He studies longitudinal student records in engineering education, team-member effectiveness, and the implementation of high-engagement teaching methods.

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Misty Loughry Georgia Southern University

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Misty L. Loughry is an Associate Professor of Management in the College of Business Administration at Georgia Southern University. She received her Ph.D. in management from University of Florida in 2001. She studies peer control and team-member effectiveness.

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Richard Layton Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Richard A. Layton is the Director of the Center for the Practice and Scholarship of Education and Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. He received a B.S. from California State University, Northridge, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Washington. His areas of scholarship include student team-building, team-formation and peer-evaluation, laboratory reform, data analysis and presentation, and system dynamics. Prior to his academic career, Dr. Layton worked in consulting engineering, culminating as a group head and a project manager. He is a guitarist and songwriter with the classic alternative rock band “Whisper Down”.

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Hal R. Pomeranz Deer Run Associates, Inc.

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Hal Pomeranz is the founder and technical lead of Deer Run Associates, and a recognized expert in the fields of Information Security and Systems Management. He is a Faculty Fellow of the SANS Institute and a frequently published author. Hal has been the Lead Developer of the current CATME and Team-Maker interfaces since the project's inception.

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David Woehr University of Tennessee, Knoxville

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David J. Woehr is a Professor in the Department of Management at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He received his Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Georgia Institute of Technology in 1989. Dr. Woehr ‘s research focuses on the measurement and evaluation of individual job performance, managerial assessment centers, and applied measurement. Dr. Woehr currently serves as an associate editor for Human Performance and is an elected fellow of the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology (SIOP), the American Psychological Association (APA), and the Association for Psychological Science (APS).

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Eduardo Salas University of Central Florida

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Eduardo Salas is University Trustee Chair and Pegasus Professor of Psychology at the University of Central Florida where he also holds an appointment as Program Director for the Human Systems Integration Research Department at the Institute for Simulation and Training. Dr. Salas has co-authored over 320 journal articles and book chapters and has co-edited 19 books. His expertise includes teamwork, team training strategies, training effectiveness, decision making under stress, and performance measurement tools. Dr. Salas is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, President-Elect of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and a recipient of the Meritorious Civil Service Award from the Department of the Navy.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

SMARTER Teamwork: System for Management, Assessment, Research, Training, Education, and Remediation for Teamwork

Abstract

The rapid adoption of Team-Maker and the Comprehensive Assessment of Team Member Effectiveness (CATME), tools for team formation and peer evaluation, make it possible to extend their success to have a significant impact on the development of team skills in higher education. The web-based systems are used by over 700 faculty at over 200 institutions internationally.

This paper and its accompanying poster will describe strategies for broadening the scope of those tools into a complete system for the management of teamwork in undergraduate education. The System for the Management, Assessment, Research, Training, Education, and Remediation of Teamwork (SMARTER Teamwork) has three specific goals: 1) to equip students to work in teams by providing them with training and feedback, 2) to equip faculty to manage student teams by providing them with information and tools to facilitate best practices, and 3) to equip researchers to understand teams by broadening the system’s capabilities to collect additional types of data so that a wider range of research questions can be studied through a secure researcher interface. The three goals of the project support each other in hierarchical fashion: research informs faculty practice, faculty determine the students’ experience, which, if well managed based on research findings, equips students to work in teams. Our strategies for achieving these goals are based on a well-accepted training model that has five elements: information, demonstration, practice, feedback, and remediation.

Different outcomes are expected for each group of people. For the students, both individual outcomes, such as student learning, and team outcomes, such as the development of shared mental models, are expected. For the faculty, individual outcomes such as faculty learning and faculty satisfaction are expected. The outcomes for researchers will be community outcomes, that is, benefits for stakeholders outside the research team, such as generating new knowledge for teaming theory and disseminating best practices. Measuring these outcomes is the basis for the project’s evaluation plan.

Research Overview. The broad and deep scope of the proposed SMARTER Teamwork research is summarized in Figure 1. The figure addresses the project’s three broad research goals, people impacted, strategies for achieving the goals, and measureable outcomes. Goals. The proposed work has three goals: 1), equip students to work in teams; 2), equip faculty to manage teams; and 3), equip this research team to understand student teams. These goals support each other in hierarchical fashion: research informs faculty practice, faculty determine the students’ experience, which, if well managed based on research findings, should equip students to work in teams. People. People are the groups that will use the proposed system: students, faculty, and researchers. The hierarchy of people reflects the hierarchy of goals: the work of the research team supports the work of faculty, which in turn supports the work of students and their teams.

Ohland, M., & Loughry, M., & Layton, R., & Pomeranz, H. R., & Woehr, D., & Salas, E. (2010, June), Smarter Teamwork: System For The Management, Assessment, Research, Training, Education, And Remediation Of Teamwork Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/16605

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