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STEM Professionals with Class

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Middle School Engineering Programs, Curriculum, and Evaluation

Tagged Division

K-12 & Pre-College Engineering

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

22.1323.1 - 22.1323.18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/18783

Download Count

30

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Paper Authors

biography

Sharon F. Bendall San Diego State University, Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Education

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Sharon Bendall started her career as a professional physicist at IBM’s T.J. Watson Laboratory but early on switched her focus to physics education. She is an Adjunct Faculty member of the San Diego State University Physics Department and a Senior Scientist in SDSU’s Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Education. As a nationally recognized materials developer and leader of professional development, she has been the PI or co-PI on many NSF grants in science. She has developed and implemented numerous content and pedagogical workshops for K-12 teachers, and is a lead author of the nationally disseminated middle school curriculum Interactions in Physical Science. Bendall is currently one of the PIs on an NSF research and development grant aimed at identifying learning progressions in elementary teachers and students in the domain of scientific inquiry.

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Christina Deckard SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific

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Christina Deckard received a B.S. and an M.S. in Physics from San Diego State University. She also received an M.S. in Mathematics Education from San Diego State University. Ms. Deckard is a Senior Scientist at SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific in San Diego working in the Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Department. Ms. Deckard has also taught at numerous local colleges and universities in the Mathematics and Physics Departments.

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Clarisa E Bercovich Guelman California State University, San Marcos

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I have a M.Sc. in Physics and a Ph.D. in Physics Education.
I am interested in Physics Education Research. I conducted research about teachers' implementation of reform-based curricula and about students' conceptual understanding of Chaos.
I developed face to face and online professional development workshops for elementary, middle school and high school teachers.
I taught courses on Physics for middle and high school students and teachers, as well as several Physics courses at college.

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Nancy A. Taylor San Diego County Office of Education

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Ms. Taylor is currently the Science Coordinator/Curriculum Specialist for K-12 science education at the San Diego Office of Education. She received her M.A. degree in Educational Administration in 1995 from the United States International University. She holds a California multiple subject teaching credential with emphasis in general science and bilingual/cross-cultural education. Ms. Taylor is the Co-Founder of the San Diego Science Alliance a non-profit 501c3 organization where she currently serves as the Executive Director. She served as Co-Principal Investigator for CyberTEAM (NSF- CyberInfrastructure) and PISCES (NSF GK-12) initiatives focused on elementary and middle school science. She currently administers NOAA, EPA, and California Department of Education grants and acts as a liaison to districts for other NSF funded grants. Previously, she has been both an Elementary School Principal and District Science Coordinator for the Ramona Unified School District in San Diego County. She has taught courses in Teacher Education at the University of California, San Diego, UC Irvine, and San Diego State University. Ms. Taylor is a well-recognized author and contributing author on science teaching published by the California Department of Education, San Diego County Office of Education and several professional development journals.
Ms. Taylor coordinates science and environmental education professional development programs for K-12 in-service science teachers in San Diego’s 42 school districts, including the STEM Collaboratory. Taylor has built a large network of professional educators, education researchers and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) professionals who actively collaborate to improve science education for K-University in San Diego County.

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Adrienne Marriott San Diego Science Alliance

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Program Manager, STEM Professionals With Class

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Abstract

The goal of this work was to implement and evaluate a model for bringing STEMprofessionals (hereafter STEMs) together with teachers and students to positivelyinfluence their understandings of science and attitudes toward science, and to enhanceSTEM understanding of science education. Teachers were immersed for one day in eachof three professional STEM labs, then STEMs reciprocally visited teachers’ classrooms.Although this in itself is not novel, the details and support for these interactions separatethis project from other scientist/teacher collaborations. Nine eighth grade teachers andnine STEMs were recruited for participation. A demographically similar control group ofteachers and students was assembled. Demographics primarily included AfricanAmerican, Asian, Hispanic and White ethnicities.Phase 1 was a kick-off meeting hosted at a STEM laboratory, including brief STEMpresentations about their work and descriptions of what teachers would do shouldteachers be immersed in their particular lab. The kick-off met the dual objectives ofacquainting teachers with the lab environment and initiating relationships betweenteachers and STEMs.In Phase 2 teams of three teachers spent a day with a STEM in his/her lab. Teachershelped conduct experiments, entered data into computer programs, set up equipment, satin on lab meetings, etc. The objective of these visits was to provide teachers with real-world science experiences.In Phase 3 STEMs visited the eighth grade classrooms of the teachers who wereimmersed in their labs. STEM visits began with a brief description of himself/herself, ofhis/her work, and moved on to an activity brought by the STEM that was representativeof the STEM’s work. Prior to the lab immersions and classroom visits, project staffinteracted with each STEM to ensure that experience-rich days were planned.Data collected by an external evaluator included: (a) online multiple choice responses toa pre/post student questionnaire, (b) classroom observations by the project evaluator, (c)teacher interviews to assess teachers’ perception of what they learned from the projectand how their students benefited from it, (d) STEM interviews aimed at understandinghow the project influenced the STEMS, and how they perceived the project benefit toteachers and students. Student questionnaire results were examined using a two-waypaired student's t-test analysis comparing pre/post data for each item. This analysis wasdone for the treatment as well as for the control group. A two-way unpaired student's t-test analysis comparing the change in the treatment group to the change in the controlgroup was also performed. This paper will present the analyses and interview outcomesof the project. Knowledge gained from this project will be used to refine the model andprovide a foundation for further STEM and K-12 collaboration. Project results andsupport materials will be available on the Internet. This project was conducted through acollaboration of a federal agency, university staff, county education staff and the privatesector, under the auspices of a nonprofit organization of local businesses dedicated toenhancing science education in a large city in the southwestern USA.

Bendall, S. F., & Deckard, C., & Bercovich Guelman, C. E., & Taylor, N. A., & Marriott, A. (2011, June), STEM Professionals with Class Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. https://peer.asee.org/18783

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