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Strategies For The Integration Of Computer Based Simulation Technology Into The Engineering Curriculum

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Software and E-learning in the ME Curriculum

Tagged Division

Mechanical Engineering

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

12.1303.1 - 12.1303.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2751

Download Count

11

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Paper Authors

biography

Rajesh Bhaskaran Cornell University

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Rajesh Bhaskaran is the Director of Swanson Engineering Simulation Program in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at
Cornell University. He is leading efforts in the Sibley School to integrate contemporary simulation technologies into the mechanical and
aerospace engineering curriculum. As part of this initiative, he is developing web-based curriculum material for integrating the ANSYS and
FLUENT packages into solid and fluid mechanics courses. He holds a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from Iowa State University.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Strategies for the Integration of Computer-Based Simulation Technology into the Engineering Curriculum Abstract

While Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) technology has revolutionized engineering analysis, design and research, its penetration into the undergraduate mechanical engineering curriculum has been limited. As a result, undergraduate students do not acquire a solid foundation in CAE technology that they can build upon during the course of their careers. Our pedagogical approach for integrating CAE software into courses has three key elements. First, the CAE experience revolves around a series of case studies in which students use CAE software to simulate canonical problems with known analytical solutions, approximations or experimental data. These case studies are a platform both to provide a guided introduction to the appropriate use of CAE technology as well as to reinforce basic theoretical and physical concepts traditionally covered in lectures. Second, web-based tutorials are used to teach students the mechanics of using the software interface. This ensures that instructor time is devoted to explaining underlying concepts rather than to teaching the intricacies of the software interface. Thus, our emphasis is on imparting concepts rather than raw software skills. Third, the necessary numerical concepts are introduced “just-in-time” in a focused manner in order to meet tight time constraints. Verification and validation of results are emphasized throughout. The above approach has been implemented in a fluid dynamics course using the FLUENT package and in two solid mechanics courses using the ANSYS package. “Teaching modules” based on selected case-studies are being developed for the FLUENT and ANSYS packages. Each teaching module consists of three components: (i) a web- based tutorial that takes students through the steps involved in solving the case study problem (with nominal parameters) using the relevant CAE package; (ii) notes describing related theoretical and numerical concepts that can be handed out to students; (iii) problem set with solutions.

1 Introduction

Within the last fifteen years, computer-based simulation has become an integral part of design, analysis and research in engineering. The increasingly widespread use of Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) has been driven by the dramatic reduction in the cost of computing hardware and the maturing of off-the-shelf, commercial software packages. Commercial CAE packages such as ANSYS, ALGOR, FLUENT, Pro/Engineer, and STAR-CD are now routinely used to simulate engineering systems in a wide range of industries. Despite the pervasive use of CAE technology in industry and research, its use in the undergraduate curriculum has been limited. As a result, undergraduate students do not acquire a solid foundation in CAE technology that they can build upon during the course of their careers. Furthermore, the potential for CAE tools to enhance the learning experience is not realized. For instance, these tools can be used as virtual-lab environments for hands-on, visual learning. They also enable the instructor to make strong connections between theory and practice.

Bhaskaran, R. (2007, June), Strategies For The Integration Of Computer Based Simulation Technology Into The Engineering Curriculum Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2751

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