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Student Initiated Supplemental Training Curriculum For Support Of Bme Design Projects

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Integrating Design into the BME Curriculum

Tagged Division

Biomedical

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

14.1083.1 - 14.1083.9

DOI

10.18260/1-2--5697

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/5697

Download Count

114

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Paper Authors

biography

Amit Nimunkar University of Wisconsin, Madison

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Amit J. Nimunkar is a doctoral student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is a teaching assistant at the Department of Biomedical Engineering and a lead consultant for the freshman design course, Introduction to Engineering. He also works as a chemistry instructor and curriculum coordinator for the Engineering Summer Program in the College of Engineering and is pursuing a Delta certificate in teaching and learning.

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biography

Silas Bernardoni University of Wisconsin, Madison

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Silas Bernardoni is a graduate student in Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Wisconsin Madison, College of Engineering. Design and fabrication has been one of his main activities and hobbies his entire life while growing up on a farm in rural Wisconsin. He has been on the Intro to Engineering Design teaching team for three years and is currently the Teaching Assistant in charge of planning and coordinating all fabrication training and seminars. His graduate research focuses on usability testing and implantation systems for open source software and low cost electronics in developing countries. He is also the TA for the Triathlon Training course on campus and loves to teach people at every chance he gets. His other activities include XO computers, cycling, mountaineering, backpacking, traveling, and building medieval catapults.

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Tyler Lark University of Wisconsin, Madison

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Tyler J. Lark is a fourth-year undergraduate student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and a Student Assistant (SA) for the Introduction to Engineering Design course at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. He is pursuing his BS in BME and a second major in Mathematics. His interests include teaching, educational research, and environmentally sustainable engineering.

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Willis Tompkins University of Wisconsin, Madison

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Willis J. Tompkins received the Ph.D. degree in biomedical electronic engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1973. He is currently Professor of Biomedical Engineering and
Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he has been on the faculty since 1974. Dr. Tompkins is a Life Fellow of the IEEE, a Founding Fellow of the AIMBE, and an Inaugural Fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society. He is a past President of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society and a past Chair of the ASEE
Biomedical Engineering Division.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Student Initiated Supplemental Training Curriculum for Support of BME Design Projects

Abstract

Our Biomedical Engineering (BME) Department requires the undergraduate students to take a design course every semester beginning in their first semester sophomore year for six sequential courses. The students do client-based design projects in teams, wherein they apply the knowledge they learned in various classes to real-world problems. The design projects are diverse and often require fabrication and technical skills they have previously encountered in their coursework. A supplemental training curriculum was created by the more experienced students who act as Student Facilitators (SFs) to specifically to meet the needs of the BME students for their design projects. A similar supplemental training curriculum was developed and implemented by upperclass students to meet the needs of freshmen students for the Introduction to Engineering (InterEgr 160) design course at our university in the Fall 2007. The success of this supplemental training curriculum has inspired the BME Department to collaborate with the InterEgr 160 staff to provide hands-on training to BME students at all levels. The content of the supplemental curriculum is dictated by the experiences of fellow undergraduate engineering students when working on their design projects. Since the supplemental training curriculum is developed and implemented by the students, it results in the ability to offer just-in-time learning to students based upon their needs during the current semester. Students can request training on any specific topic, and seminars can be scheduled and offered in as little as a week’s time. Students who become SFs gain valuable experience in mentoring, developing educational content, and evaluating learning outcomes. They also develop technical expertise in a variety of topics. These added educational opportunities for students impact all educational levels, from freshmen to graduate students. This paper will discuss the organizational framework of the partnership between InterEgr 160 and the BME Department, the educational content created by the SFs, the resources used to implement the supplemental training curriculum, and the costs incurred.

I. Introduction/Background

The Biomedical Engineering (BME) Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison requires all undergraduate students to take a design course every semester beginning in their first-semester sophomore year for six sequential courses. The students work in a team on a client-centered biomedical engineering design project to learn concept generation, product analysis, specifications, evaluation, clinical trials, regulation, liability, and ethics. Thus the design course provides students an opportunity to learn about engineering design and the process of integrating engineering and life sciences to solve real-world biomedical engineering problems. It also teaches them how to function on diverse teams, develop leadership skills and to take initiative to communicate their ideas and thoughts effectively across disciplines1. The students work on a variety of interesting and challenging projects. Some examples of the projects are:

Nimunkar, A., & Bernardoni, S., & Lark, T., & Tompkins, W. (2009, June), Student Initiated Supplemental Training Curriculum For Support Of Bme Design Projects Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. 10.18260/1-2--5697

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