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Student Response to Instructional Practices (StRIP) Survey in Engineering Classrooms: Validating a Spanish Version

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Faculty and Student Perspective on Instructional Strategies

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

16

DOI

10.18260/1-2--35237

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35237

Download Count

154

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Paper Authors

biography

Monica Quezada-Espinoza Universidad Andres Bello, Chile Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-0383-0179

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Monica Quezada-Espinoza is professor and researcher at the School of Engineering at the University Andres Bello in Santiago, Chile. She holds a bachelor degree in Engineering Physics from UACJ, a master degree in Education, and a doctoral degree in Innovational Education, both from Tecnologico de Monterrey. Her research has been carried out within Physics Education Research in which she studies students’ conceptual learning and understanding, designs and implements assessment tools in education, researches on the use of technology in the classroom and physics laboratory, and conducts research on the determination of what are the main factors that influence learning and understanding of first semester engineering students. Monica is currently collaborating with the Educational and Academic Innovation Unit, UNIDA (for its acronym in Spanish) at the School of Engineering of the Andres Bello University, where she works as teacher trainer in active learning methodologies, she teaches undergraduate courses in Environmental Management and Energy and Circular Economy, and is a thesis advisor on the engineering programs at this institution. Her research interest topics involve university education in STEM areas, faculty development, research-based activities, evaluation tools and technology, and gender issues in STEM education.

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Angeles Dominguez Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico, and Universidad Andres Bello, Chile Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6066-355X

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Angeles Dominguez is a Professor of the Department of Mathematics within the School of Engineering, a researcher at the School of Education, and Associate Dean of Faculty Development at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences at the Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico. Also, she is currently collaborating with the School of Engineering at the University Andres Bello at Santiago, Chile. Angeles holds a bachelor degree in Physics Engineering from Tecnologico de Monterrey and a doctoral degree in Mathematics Education from Syracuse University, NY. Dr. Dominguez is a member of the Researchers’ National System in Mexico (SNI-2) and has been a visiting researcher at Syracuse University, at UT-Austin and at Universidad Andres Bello. She teaches undergraduate courses in Mathematics, graduate courses in Education, and is a thesis advisor on the master and doctoral programs on education at the Tecnologico de Monterrey. Her main research areas are: faculty development, teaching methods, and gender issues in STEM education.

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Genaro Zavala Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico, and Universidad Andres Bello, Chile Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-5880-1124

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Genaro Zavala is a Full Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the School of Engineering and Sciences at Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico. He collaborates with the Faculty of Engineering of the Universidad Andres Bello in Santiago, Chile. Professor Zavala is National Researcher Level 1 of the National System of Researchers of Mexico. He works with the following research lines: conceptual understanding, active learning, development of assessment tools, faculty development and studies in STEM. Genaro Zavala was appointed to the editorial board of the Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research journal of the American Physical Society for the period 2015 to 2018, vice president of the Latin American Physics Education Network (LAPEN) for the period 2013-2015 and is currently the coordinator of the Topical Group: Evaluation of Learning and Instruction of the International Group for Research and Teaching of Physics (GIREP by its French acronym). Dr. Zavala is a member of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) where he was vice president candidate, a member of the Committee on Research in Physics Education (RIPE) a member and chair of the International Education Committee and elected member of Leadership Organizing Physics Education Research Council (PERLOC) in the period 2015-2018.

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Juan Felipe Calderón Universidad Andres Bello, Chile

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Juan Felipe Calderón received the bachelor’s in computer science and MSc and PhD degrees in engineering sciences from the Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile.
He is an assistant professor in the Faculty of Engineering at the Universidad Andres Bello, Viña del Mar, Chile. His research and teaching is focused on software engineering, software design, distributed systems and computer-supported collaborative learning, and new strategies for computer science teaching.

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Abstract

This research paper reports the validity methodology and the results obtained in constructing the Spanish version of a well-known instrument to assess instructional practices. Since 2014, the School of Engineering of the Universidad Andres Bello in Chile has invested resources into transforming teaching practices from a traditional approach to active learning methodologies. To reach this goal, the Educational and Academic Innovation Unit (UNIDA, for its acronym in Spanish) designed a recursive Engineering Faculty Development program that uses the conceptual change approach as a framework. It is specially designed to promote and ensure the use of innovative, active-learning methodologies in Engineering classes. Since 2015, we have been implementing this program and reporting on its evolution and the resulting shifts in paradigm in the teaching practices of the faculty members. All the interventions are done by the faculty (teaching); however, the final impact is on the students (learning). So, we assessed how students responded to these new programs and analyzed the diverse types of teaching implemented by the engineering faculty, using the Student Response to Instructional Practices (StRIP) survey. The StRIP measures students' responses to the kinds of instruction delivered in the undergraduate engineering classrooms. It consists of three main sections: 1) the types of instruction, categorized as interactive, constructive, active, and passive, 2) the strategies underlying the in-class activities, i.e., explanation and facilitation, and 3) the student responses to instruction, as measured in the subscales of value, positivity, participation, distraction, and evaluation. In this paper, we present the process of translating the StRIP from English into Spanish and its subsequent validation. The process included i) forward and backward translation, ii) review by an expert committee, iii) two focus group sessions with engineering students and iv) pilot testing. In the pilot testing, 346 students enrolled in Engineering courses in various semesters of their curricula participated. We used this data to evaluate the internal reliability of the tool using the Cronbach alpha test (α = 0 .920), which indicated that our Spanish version of the StRIP was internally consistent. We concluded that the translated version of the StRIP was a validated instrument that could be applied in future formal implementations where the aim is to understand better the students' responses to pedagogical strategies used in Spanish-speaking classrooms.

Quezada-Espinoza, M., & Dominguez, A., & Zavala, G., & Calderón, J. F. (2020, June), Student Response to Instructional Practices (StRIP) Survey in Engineering Classrooms: Validating a Spanish Version Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--35237

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