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Students’ Perceptions Of The Importance Of Faculty Technical Currency, Teaching Techniques, And Commitment To Student Success For Their Learning/ Success

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Non-Technical Skills Build Success in ET

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

22

Page Numbers

13.1114.1 - 13.1114.22

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4054

Download Count

10

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Paper Authors

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Ahmed Khan DeVry University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-5330-5380

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Gene Gloeckner Colorado State University

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George Morgan Colorado State University

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THE IMPORTANCE OF

FACULTY TECHNICAL CURRENCY, TEACHING TECHNIQUES,

AND COMMITMENT TO STUDENT SUCCESS FOR THEIR

LEARNING/ SUCCESS

Abstract

The paper presents the results of a study that explored the relationships between students’ perceptions of the importance of three faculty dimensions --- technical currency, teaching techniques, and commitment to student success --- to their learning/success, expressed in terms of self-reported technical competencies and GPA in a technology-based baccalaureate electronics engineering technology (EET) program at a teaching university. The sample (N=225) was composed of seniors of the BSEET program from 13 geographically diverse campuses of a teaching university. More than 75% of the EET seniors agreed that the constructs of faculty technical currency, teaching techniques, and commitment to student success, are important to their learning/success.

Regression analyses revealed significant and direct relationships between: (a) faculty technical currency (FTC) and student learning/success in terms of self reported technical competency (effect size is medium), (b) faculty teaching techniques (FTT) and student learning/success in terms of self reported technical competency (effect size is medium-to- large), (c) faculty commitment to student success (FCSS) and student learning/success in terms of self-reported technical competency (effect size is medium), (d) faculty technical currency (FTC) and faculty teaching techniques (FTT) [large effect size], and, (e) faculty technical currency (FTC) and faculty commitment to student success (FCSS) [effect size is large]. An effect size is a quantitative indicator used in correlational studies to signify the statistical significance regarding the strength of the relationship between the independent variable and the dependent variable. It indicates how much variance in the dependent variable can be predicted from the independent variable.(Effect size scale used for the study: small (s) = 0.1 – 0.15, small-medium (sm) = 0.151 – 0.249, medium (m) = 0.25 – 0.35, medium-large (ml) = 0.351 – 0.449, large (l) ≥ 0.45). The recommendations based on the study suggest ways to improve faculty development and training activities to promote student learning in the domains of engineering technology.

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Khan, A., & Gloeckner, G., & Morgan, G. (2008, June), Students’ Perceptions Of The Importance Of Faculty Technical Currency, Teaching Techniques, And Commitment To Student Success For Their Learning/ Success Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/4054

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