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Study Of Sodium Borohydride Catalyst For Hydrogen Generation Purdue University Surf Program

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Information Technology in Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Education

Tagged Division

Nuclear and Radiological

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

11.1173.1 - 11.1173.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/202

Download Count

361

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Paper Authors

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Josh Walter Purdue University

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Dan Montgomery Purdue University

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Shripad Revankar Purdue University

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Dr. Shripad Revankar is currently an associate professor and Chair of Undergraduate Committee in the School of Nuclear Engineering at Purdue University. He received MS and Ph.D in Physics from Karnatak University, India and M.Eng. in Nuclear Engineering from McMaster University, Canada. He has worked as post doctoral researcher at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and at University of California, Berkeley. His current research interests are in advanced nuclear reactor design, two-phase flow, microgravity multiphase flow in packed beds, fuel cell design, simulation and power systems, and thermochemical water splitting hydrogen production with high temperature gas cooled reactors, reactor thermalhydraulics and safety.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Study of Sodium Borohydride Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation - Purdue University SURF Program

Abstract

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) need pure form of hydrogen for this metal hydride seems to be one of the best storage media. Amongst hydrides, sodium borohydride, NaBH4 is desirable due to its high hydrogen storage efficiency of 10.80% and the excellent stability of its alkaline solutions. The alkaline borohydride solutions undergo hydrolysis in presence of various transition-metal catalysts to produce hydrogen. The hydrolysis product being borox it can be recycled. For the hydrolysis process of NABH4, various catalysts of Pt, Ru, Ni, Co etc., have been developed for hydrogen production from borohydride solutions and reported in recent years. However, implementation of these catalysts into the fuel cell is a challenge. A summer research project with an undergraduate was launched in developing catalyst for hydrogen generation in PEMFC fuel cell. Catalysts based on chlorides of Co, NI and Ru was developed and was directly deposited on metal foam. The resulting catalyst particles are nano- size and hence provide high catalytic activities in hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride solutions. Experiments were performed on the characterizing hydrogen generation rate as function of temperature and catalysts type. The project was carried under summer undergraduate research fellow (SURF) program.

Introduction

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are on the verge of commercialization and expected to replace the internal combustion engine in transportation as well as residential power production1. However, efficient operation of the PEMFC needs hydrogen in pure form. In view of the above, on site hydrogen production from the chemical hydrides is attractive, since the hydrogen will be purer without any fuel cell poisons. Among the hydrides, sodium borohydride, NaBH4 is desirable due to its high hydrogen storage efficiency of 10.80% and the excellent stability of its alkaline solutions. Schlesinger and Brown2 disclosed a method of preparing alkali metal borohydrides and they noted that sodium borohydride was highly soluble in water, was stable in solution up to 400oC, and could be used to reduce metal salts to their metallic form, such as the reduction of nickel sulfate to nickel boride, Ni2B. Schlesinger et al.3 have reported that the alkaline borohydride solutions undergo hydrolysis in presence of various transition-metal catalysts to produce hydrogen. Sodium borohydride reacts with water according to the following reaction: NaBH4 + 2H2O NaBO2 + 4H2, alternatively, in an alkaline borohydride solution as: BH4- + 2H2O 4H2 + BO2-. Schlesinger and Brown realized that the formation of the metaborate ion (BH4-) made the 1

hydrolyzing solution basic and quickly slowed the reaction; however, they found that the use of metal salts acted as catalytic accelerators for the hydrolysis reaction. Mn(II)Cl2, Fe(II)Cl2,

Walter, J., & Montgomery, D., & Revankar, S. (2006, June), Study Of Sodium Borohydride Catalyst For Hydrogen Generation Purdue University Surf Program Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/202

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