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Successes Of An Engineering Residential College Program Within An Emerging Residential Culture

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Learning as a Community

Tagged Division

First-Year Programs

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

14.1094.1 - 14.1094.11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--5179

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/5179

Download Count

35

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Paper Authors

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Sondra Miller Boise State University

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Dr. Miller is Faculty in Residence for the Engineering Residential College and Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering in the College of Engineering, Boise State University.

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Pat Pyke Boise State University

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Ms. Pyke is Director of Education Research in the College of Engineering, Boise State University.

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Amy Moll Boise State University

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Dr. Moll is Associate Professor in Materials Science Engineering in the College of Engineering, Boise State University.

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Melissa Wintrow Boise State University

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Ms. Wintrow is Assistant Director of Residential Education in University Housing, Boise State University.

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Cheryl Schrader Boise State University

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Dr. Schrader is Dean and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the College of Engineering, Boise State University.

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Janet Callahan Boise State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6665-1584

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Dr. Callahan is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Materials Science Engineering in the College of Engineering, Boise State University.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Successes of an Engineering Residential College Program within an Emerging Residential Culture

Abstract

Boise State University is in the process of transforming from a historically “commuter” campus into a metropolitan research university which includes a growing residential culture (currently 8% of students live in residence halls). First time, full time freshmen age 18 or younger have increased from 61% of the incoming class in 2000 to 72% of the incoming class in 2008. To support our growing residential culture, University Housing, in cooperation with six academic colleges, began the Residential College (RC) program in 2004. Key among the five current RC communities is the College of Engineering. The Engineering Residential College (ERC) admits first and second year students with declared majors in one of our six undergraduate programs (civil engineering, computer science, construction management, electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, and mechanical engineering) and undeclared engineering. The 2007- 2008 academic year was the first during which an engineering faculty member lived in residence, the Faculty-in-Residence (FiR), with the 26 members of the ERC. The physical structure of the ERC supported collaborative work and study with student community members. Daily interaction of student ERC community members with the FiR and structured activities outside the classroom facilitated learning that enhanced engineering academics. In this paper, we discuss the qualitative life skills and quantitative academic successes of this living-learning community facilitated by a live-in engineering faculty member during the past three semesters and make recommendations for improving the overall ERC experience.

Introduction and Background

Living-learning communities are enhancing student success and enriching campus culture as Boise State University transforms from a historically “commuter” campus into a metropolitan research university.1,2 Freshmen, age 18 or younger, have increased from 61% of the incoming class in 2000 to 72% of the incoming class in 2008. More of our students are following a traditional approach to their education, which includes residing in on-campus housing during their first and second years.

Living-learning communities support overall student academic success and retention.3,4 To support the growing residential culture at Boise State University (currently 8% of students live in residence halls), University Housing, in cooperation with six academic colleges, began the Residential College (RC) program in 2004. Five communities were formed around similar majors or academic interests where students live and learn together. These five communities include: Arts and Humanities, Business and Economics, Civic Leadership, Engineering, and Health Professions. The Engineering Residential College (ERC) is a living-learning option for first and second year students with declared majors in one of our six undergraduate programs (civil engineering, computer science, construction management, electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, and mechanical engineering) and undecided engineering. It is generally understood that student cohorts experience greater academic success and retention.5,6 Research shows that students who make meaningful connections with faculty are academically more successful.7,8 The RC program at Boise State University is further enhanced

Miller, S., & Pyke, P., & Moll, A., & Wintrow, M., & Schrader, C., & Callahan, J. (2009, June), Successes Of An Engineering Residential College Program Within An Emerging Residential Culture Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. 10.18260/1-2--5179

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2009 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015