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Sustainable Water: Development, Delivery and Assessment of K-5 Modules

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Conference

2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Atlanta, Georgia

Publication Date

June 23, 2013

Start Date

June 23, 2013

End Date

June 26, 2013

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Sustainability and engineering education

Tagged Division

Environmental Engineering

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

23.1123.1 - 23.1123.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22508

Download Count

33

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Paper Authors

biography

Alexandre David Wing Colorado School of Mines

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Alexandre is a Masters student at Colorado School of Mines in Environmental Science and Engineering. His research focus includes finding and evaluating opportunities for improving water quality during managed aquifer recharge, a sustainable natural treatment method. Alexandre graduated from Montana State University in 2011 with a BS in Biological Science.

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Cristal Hibbard Colorado School of Mines

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Cristal Hibbard has a B.S. in Engineering with an Environmental Specialty from the Colorado School of Mines. While completing her M.S. in Environmental Science & Engineering, Cristal was a Lead Graduate Fellow for the Bechtel K-5 Educational Excellence Initiative, an element of the Trefney Institute at the Colorado School of Mines.

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Jennifer Strong Colorado School of Mines

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Jennifer Strong is a Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). She is also the K-12 Outreach Program Manager for the Trefny Institute for Educational Innovation at CSM, whose goal is to strengthen on-campus endeavors in undergraduate and graduate education and strengthen CSM’s leadership role in education research, curriculum development, and assessment.

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Jörg E Drewes Colorado School of Mines

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Jörg E. Drewes is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Director
of Research for the NSF Engineering Research Center on Reinventing the
Nation’s Urban Water Infrastructure (ReNUWIt). He also serves as Co-Director
of the Advanced Water Technology Center (AQWATEC) at the Colorado
School of Mines, which he co-founded in 2007. Prof. Drewes' research and scholarly activities have been in four areas for which he is internationally and nationally recognized and which are closely related based on the common thread of drinking water augmentation with water of impaired quality: (1) design and operation of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems including riverbank filtration and soil-aquifer treatment, (2) monitoring strategies for bulk organic carbon and emerging trace organic chemicals in natural and engineered systems, (3) performance modeling and optimized operation of energy-efficient high-pressure membranes including nanofiltration and low-pressure reverse osmosis, and (4) beneficial use of co-produced water.

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Junko Munakata-Marr Colorado School of Mines Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-3705-6265

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Dr. Munakata Marr is an Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colorado. She received her BS degree in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology and her MS and PhD degrees in Civil Engineering from Stanford University. Her research and teaching interests revolve primarily around microorganisms in engineered environmental systems, including biological wastewater treatment and methanogenesis from unconventional sources. She has nearly 20 years of experience in bioremediation. Other interests include sustainable water infrastructure, increasing diversity among STEM students and faculty, and sustainable community development.

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Abstract

Sustainable Water: Development, Delivery and Assessment of K-5 ModulesDuring the summer of 2012, a recently awarded National Science Foundation EngineeringResearch Center (ERC) paired with a university K-5 outreach program to bring cutting-edgetopics in urban water systems to local elementary classrooms. The ERC is an interdisciplinaryand multi-institutional collaboration between academic, non-profit and industrial partners withthe goal of transforming urban water infrastructure into more sustainable systems. As thepurpose of the Center is to apply technological and socio-economic advancements in engineeredand natural treatment systems to create sustainable urban water infrastructure, public outreachand education is essential to its success. The ERC thus requires each member of the center toparticipate in outreach and education, and each university is partnered with local K12 schools.The university K-5 outreach program pairs graduate students in math, physics, and engineeringwith K-5 elementary school teachers in a local school district. During the school year, thegraduate students, known as fellows, assist the teachers in their classrooms ten to fifteen hoursper week. The fellow acts as a math and science expert and assists with the instruction andunderstanding of these subjects. The fellows have some flexibility in their efforts, allowing themto bring in experiments and demos, arrange for professionals or experts to visit the classroom,plan science fairs, orchestrate field trips to the ERC campus, or run an after school science club.The program also includes a two week workshop in the summer that is mandatory training for allof the elementary teachers and graduate fellows participating in the program. This workshop isan opportunity for faculty and graduate students from the university to share their expertise andperform outreach related to their research areas. During this workshop, elementary schoolteachers learn advanced science topics, receive instructional materials (with guidance) to takeback to their classrooms, and get to know their designated graduate fellow.During two days (four two-hour sessions) of the 2012 Workshop, the ERC group introducedwater sustainability topics to the participating K-5 teachers. ERC faculty, graduate students, andfellows associated with the outreach program collaborated in teams to develop and present thelectures, lessons, and demos for each session/module. The four modules were “Natural Systems,”“Water Cycle and Water Treatment,” “Water Conservation and Re-use,” and “Taste Test andHungry Bugs.” The modules covered a wide range of water topics including the water cycle,conventional drinking water treatment, biological treatment of water and wastewater, and waterconservation, illustrated through fun and exploratory activities such as bottled vs. tap watertasting, edible aquifer parfaits, a “hungry bugs” game, and swabbing and culturing microbes.During the workshop, teachers were asked to provide feedback every two days on thepresentations they attended. They were also given a multiple choice pre- and post-test on thecontent of the sessions to evaluate how effective each presenter was at communicating theirinformation. Results of these assessments, together with feedback from the use of the lessons inthe elementary classrooms during the fall semester, will be presented.

Wing, A. D., & Hibbard, C., & Strong, J., & Drewes, J. E., & Munakata-Marr, J. (2013, June), Sustainable Water: Development, Delivery and Assessment of K-5 Modules Paper presented at 2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia. https://peer.asee.org/22508

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