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Teachers’ Engineering Design Self-Efficacy Changes Influenced by Boundary Objects and Cross-Disciplinary Interactions

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Making, Hacking, and Extracurricular Design

Tagged Division

Design in Engineering Education

Page Count

13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31045

Download Count

31

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Paper Authors

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Shaunna Fultz Smith Texas State University

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Dr. Shaunna Smith is an Assistant Professor of Educational Technology in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at Texas State University. She holds an Ed.D. in Curriculum & Instruction with an emphasis on technology integration and art education. Her teaching and research explore how the hands-on use of design-based technologies (e.g. digital fabrication, 3D modeling and printing, computer programming, and DIY robotics) can impact multidisciplinary learning that transcends traditional content contexts (e.g. arts-based STEM integration). At her free mobile makerspace for K-12 students and teachers, The MAKE Lab (http://themakelab.wp.txstate.edu), she is currently researching how recurring experiences with these design-based technologies impact visual spatial skills, self-efficacy, and positive attitudes toward failure (e.g. persistence in the face of obstacles; reconceptualization of failure as a paradigm for creative learning) with teachers and K–12 students. These concepts are also part of her research as Co-Director of Bobcat Made, which is the collaborative university makerspace.

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Kimberly Grau Talley P.E. Texas State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-6235-0706

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Dr. Kimberly G. Talley is an assistant professor in the Department of Engineering Technology, Maker Space Co-Director and Senior Research Fellow for the LBJ Institute for STEM Education and Research at Texas State University, and a licensed Professional Engineer. She received her Ph.D. and M.S.E. from the University of Texas at Austin in Structural Engineering. Her undergraduate degrees in History and in Construction Engineering and Management are from North Carolina State University. Dr. Talley teaches courses in the Construction Science and Management Program, and her research focus is in student engagement and retention in engineering and engineering technology education. Contact: talley@txstate.edu

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Araceli Martinez Ortiz Texas State University

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Araceli Martinez Ortiz, PhD., is Research Associate Professor of Engineering Education in the College of Education at Texas State University. She leads a comprehensive research agenda related to issues of curriculum and instruction in engineering education, motivation and preparation of under served populations of students and teachers and in assessing the impact of operationalizing culturally responsive teaching in the STEM classroom. As executive director of the LBJ Institute for STEM Education and Research, she collaborates on various state and national STEM education programs and is PI on major grant initiatives through NASA MUREP, NSF Improving Undergraduate STEM Education and NSF DUE . Araceli holds Engineering degrees from The University of Michigan and Kettering University. She holds a Masters degree in Education from Michigan State and a PhD in Engineering Education from Tufts University.

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Vedaraman Sriraman Texas State University

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Dr. Vedaraman Sriraman is a Piper Professor and University Distinguished Professor of Engineering Technology at Texas State University. He has served as the Associate Director of the LBJ Institute for STEM Education and Research at Texas State University. Dr. Sriraman's degrees are in Mechanical and Industrial engineering. His research interests are in engineering education, sustainability, and applied statistics. In the past, he has implemented several grants from the NSF, NASA and SME-EF. Dr. Sriraman has served as the faculty advisor to the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, the American Foundry Society and the Society of Women Engineers and as the Foundry Educational Foundation Key professor. He has also received several teaching awards at Texas State University. Currently, Dr. Sriraman serves as the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs at Texas State University.

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Abstract

As part of a larger ongoing NSF-REE-funded project focused on postsecondary maker identity within a university makerspace context, this paper reports on ten in-/pre-service teachers’ engineering design self-efficacy changes after participating in a semester-long makerspace experience at a large Hispanic-serving university in the Southwestern United States. The aim of this part of the project is to discover specific learning models that involve both STEM university students and in-/pre-service teachers in order to develop teamwork, self-efficacy, communication, and identity formation in the maker environment. The theoretical lens of boundary objects (Star & Griesemer, 1989) and cross-disciplinary collaboration (Gorman, 2010) are used to examine how specific learning models can influence change in engineering design self-efficacy. This paper presents the details of the procedural context and learning models integrated within a graduate-level educational technology course, reports on the pre-/post-test results from the Engineering Design Self-Efficacy survey instrument, and discusses implications for engineering education and engaging teachers in authentic maker integration within K-12 educational contexts.

Smith, S. F., & Talley, K. G., & Ortiz, A. M., & Sriraman, V. (2018, June), Teachers’ Engineering Design Self-Efficacy Changes Influenced by Boundary Objects and Cross-Disciplinary Interactions Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/31045

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