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Teaching Demo to Reinforce how Mechanical Properties Change Due to Heat Treatment Processes

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Collection

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Materials Experiments, Labs, Demos, and Hands-On Activities

Tagged Division

Materials

Page Count

17

Page Numbers

22.11.1 - 22.11.17

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/17285

Download Count

45

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Paper Authors

biography

Daniel J. Magda Weber State University

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Daniel J. Magda, Ph.D., Mechanical Engineer
Twelve years teaching in the Mechanical Engineering Technology program at Weber State University. Research interest (metallic materials associated with aging aircraft).

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Abstract

Teaching Demo to Reinforce how Mechanical Properties Change Due to Heat Treatment ProcessesAbstractLecture coupled with some hands on demonstration is a powerful teaching strategy forengineering students. This style of teaching was incorporated into an engineering materialsselection course. Students realize that changing material properties play an important role inunderstanding why materials are selected for different design specifications. Engineeringstudents take courses in mechanics of material, machine design, finite element analysis andcapstone senior projects. These courses require students to call out and specify the best and leastexpensive material according to some type of chemical, physical or mechanical loadingconditions. Students should understand the way a material behaves in service depends upon itsalloy composition, crystalline structure, manufacturing process and heat treat condition.This paper is written after developing a hands-on material lab that teaches engineering studentshow heat treatment processes affect material properties. Its main focus is with alloy steels,however, other metallic materials can be used and explored by the same procedure outlined inthe lab handout. The first part of the lab requires students to set up a heat treat furnace. Theyquench harden and temper ten charpy specimens. The range in hardness are from dead soft to itsmaximum hardness that the material can get. Hardness and toughness values are measured andthe data are plotted to generate material behavioral curves. From the Brinell hardness numberthe ultimate tensile strength is estimated and plotted against hardness and toughness values. Aseries of design questions in the lab handout helps reinforce the theory taught in the class roomto this hands-on learning process.

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