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Teaching Engineering Economics Via Distance Education

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Conference

2002 Annual Conference

Location

Montreal, Canada

Publication Date

June 16, 2002

Start Date

June 16, 2002

End Date

June 19, 2002

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Trends in Engineering Economy Education

Page Count

5

Page Numbers

7.1072.1 - 7.1072.5

DOI

10.18260/1-2--10057

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/10057

Download Count

83

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Paper Authors

author page

Scott Grasman

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Main Menu Session 1639

Teaching Engineering Economics via Distance Education

Scott E. Grasman University of Missouri at Rolla

Abstract

Driven by demand for distance education, the instructor lecturing to a room of students is replaced by a “virtual classroom”. This new method of delivery, coupled with the necessity for unique course administration procedures, requires a teaching approach that differs significantly from that of a traditional classroom. This paper outlines demonstrated challenges with learning and teaching via streaming video over the internet as they relate to teaching a technical class such as engineering economics. Effective communication both in and out of the classroom is discussed, along with administrative issues such as remote submittal of assignments and administration of exams. Finally, the paper presents a recommended approach to managing such issues so that instructors may provide a student-friendly learning environment.

Introduction

Motivation With the evolution of internet technology, new communication tools have facilitated the development of non-traditional classroom environments. Driven by demand for distance education, the instructor lecturing to a room of students is replaced by a “virtual classroom” with live streaming video broadcast over the internet to students around the world. This new method of delivery, coupled with the necessity for unique course administration procedures, requires a teaching approach that differs significantly from that of a traditional classroom.

In recent years, many universities have begun to offer courses and even complete degree programs via distance education. Some universities are completely internet-based. For instance, Cardean University offers online business courses and an accredited M.B.A. degree through its affiliation with leading business universities. Alternatively, traditional universities have begun to offer courses and degrees over the internet. One such program is the Boeing Systems Engineering Program, which began in 1999. The program is a collaboration between the University of Missouri at Rolla and the University of Southern California, which where chosen by the Boeing Corporation to provide a systems engineering education to many of their employees.

Although students outside Boeing are allowed to participate in the program, the majority of students in the program are full-time Boeing employees. Boeing supports its students financially by completely funding tuition and fees and also providing time off from work to attend classes and meetings. Students in the program must meet the admissions requirements for a masters degree in Engineering Management, including having a previous engineering degree with a minimum grade point average and a minimum score on the GRE. For most students, Systems Engineering is their first graduate degree program, but some have previous masters degrees

Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright Ó 2002, American Society for Engineering Education

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Grasman, S. (2002, June), Teaching Engineering Economics Via Distance Education Paper presented at 2002 Annual Conference, Montreal, Canada. 10.18260/1-2--10057

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