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Teaching Finite Element Analysis for Mechanical Undergraduate Students

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Mechanical Engineering Division Technical Session 5

Tagged Division

Mechanical Engineering

Page Count

18

DOI

10.18260/1-2--33348

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/33348

Download Count

83

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Paper Authors

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Xiaobin Le P.E. Wentworth Institute of Technology

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Professor, Ph.D, PE., Department of Mechanical Engineering and Technology, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston, MA 02115, Phone: 617-989-4223, Email: Lex@wit.edu, Specialization in Computer Aided Design, Mechanical Design, Finite Element Analysis, Fatigue Design, Solid Mechanics and Engineering Reliability

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Richard L. Roberts Wentworth Institute of Technology

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Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering,
Wentworth Institute of Technology,
550 Huntington Ave.,
Boston, MA 02115

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Anthony William Duva P.E. Wentworth Institute of Technology

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Anthony W. Duva
An Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering and Technology Department at Wentworth Institute of Technology since 2001 with 14 years of prior full time industrial experience. He has worked in the design of various technologies from advanced underwater and ultrahigh altitude propulsion systems to automated manufacturing equipment. His interests include advanced thermal and mechanical system design for green power generation.

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Abstract

Since Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has become a daily tool for design engineers in industries, mechanical engineering students must learn this tool during their education. MECH4200-Simulation-Based Design teaches how to apply FEA commercial software for mechanical undergraduate students. Teaching how to use the FEA commercial software is the main contents of this type of course. There are lots of approaches to teaching this type of course. Authors believed that understanding of the fundamental concepts of FEA theory would significantly help students to have a better understanding of FEA theory and to utilize the application of an FEA commercial software. In 2018 spring semester, authors proposed and implemented a teaching approach which included teaching fundamental concepts of FEA theory, teaching its commercial software and implementation of it in class design projects. Although some students complained about the complexity of fundamental concepts of FEA theory and tedious theoretical calculations, 92.3% of students agreed that teaching the fundamental concepts of FEA theory helped them to have a better understanding of the FEA commercial software. 92.3% of students agreed that teaching the fundamental concepts of FEA theory should be kept as part of the course. At the end of the course, we asked students to take the CSWA-S Certification, 60% of students in the section with the proposed approach passed the certification exam while other sections had an average 35.9% of pass rates. Our experience indicated that teaching the fundamental concepts of FEA theory significantly helped students to have a better understanding of FEA application and to facilitate them to use FEA commercial software.

Le, X., & Roberts, R. L., & Duva, A. W. (2019, June), Teaching Finite Element Analysis for Mechanical Undergraduate Students Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--33348

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