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Teaching Modern Control System Analysis And Design

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

6.951.1 - 6.951.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/9871

Download Count

1197

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Paper Authors

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Robert Bishop

author page

Richard Dorf

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2793

Teaching Modern Control System Analysis and Design

Robert H. Bishop, Richard C. Dorf The University of Texas at Austin / The University of California, Davis

Abstract

In today s university classroom, the process by which classical and modern control theory is taught must address the issue of integrating the theory with pertinent design issues, including modeling, implementation, complexity, and cost. In this paper the authors discuss a control system analysis and design approach adopted in their textbooks in which a series of steps embodied in a block diagram is suggested to guide students through the design process. Two examples are presented to highlight the use of the design process block diagram.

I. Introduction

Most engineering professors understand that a design paradigm shift has occurred in recent years wherein product performance issues are overshadowed by manufacturing and cost issues. Practical matters are paramount. As might be expected, the various engineering disciplines have been impacted to varying degrees. In the systems and controls area, the design paradigm shift emphasizes the need for students to understand the practical issues (such as modeling and implementation) associated with control system design. In the past, these practical issues have been the forte of mechanical, chemical, and aerospace engineering departments, while the delivery of systems and control theory has been the strength of electrical engineering departments. This comment is based on anecdotal (hence debatable) evidence and certainly there are exceptions. What is clear, however, is that to prepare students for productive careers in systems and controls, engineering courses must address the issue of integrating the theory with relevant design issues, including modeling, implementation, complexity, and cost. As always, we must remain cognizant of the fact that every student should design control systems upon a firm foundation of mathematics and systems theory. So in the end it is a question of balance. We believe that the control system analysis and design approach adopted by the authors in their learning materials, including the textbook entitled Modern Control Systems1, the supplemental text Modern Control Systems Analysis and Design Using MATLAB and Simulink2, and the website http://www.prenhall.com/dorf achieves this balance, hence can play a significant role in presenting practical notions of design of control systems in a chalk-and-talk lecture.

It is important to introduce students to the process of control system design in a fashion that is familiar and inviting. To this end, for students studying control systems we suggest a series of steps embodied in the familiar block diagram form shown in Fig. 1 to guide students through the design process. Since design is a creative endeavor, there is not a unique design approach that always leads to a good design for different classes of problems. Recognizing this fact, we

Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright ' 2001, American Society for Engineering Education

Bishop, R., & Dorf, R. (2001, June), Teaching Modern Control System Analysis And Design Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/9871

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2001 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015