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Teaching Portfolios In Academia – How Are They Used?

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Tricks of the Trade for Teaching I

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

11.1219.1 - 11.1219.16

DOI

10.18260/1-2--1156

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1156

Download Count

175

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Paper Authors

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Jessica Yellin University of Washington

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JESSICA M. H. YELLIN is a Research Scientist for the Scholarship on Teaching element of the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE). She holds a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Washington with dissertation research on structural vibration and damping of acoustic noise in thin-walled structures.

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Yi-Min Huang University of Washington

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YI-MIN HUANG is a Research Scientist for the Scholarship on Teaching element of the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE). She holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from Washington State University. Her research interests include assessment and evaluation.

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Jennifer Turns University of Washington

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JENNIFER TURNS is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Technical Communication, College of Engineering, University of Washington. She leads the Scholarship on Teaching element of the CAEE. She is also a Faculty Affiliate with the Center for Engineering Learning and Teaching and the Program for Educational Transformation through Technology.

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Charity Tsuruda University of Washington

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CHARITY TSURUDA is an undergraduate research assistant for the Scholarship on Teaching element of the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE). She is a junior in Industrial Engineering at the University of Washington.

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Abstract
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Teaching Portfolios in Academia – How Are They Used? Abstract

This paper presents a study that focuses on how 16 colleges and universities across the United States have incorporated teaching portfolios into their institutions. The two most common types of teaching portfolios are described in terms of their purpose, audience, and what elements they might contain. Reasons for creating and maintaining teaching portfolios include documenting teaching for merit reviews, promotion and tenure cases, faculty job searches, sharing course designs, and promoting reflective practice. Because the process of creating a personal teaching portfolio can be challenging, many institutions provide guidance to graduate students and faculty who are developing teaching portfolios.

Introduction

The use of teaching portfolios in academia has increased in popularity in recent years. As colleges and universities continue to improve their commitment to teaching, the need for strategies to document teaching as a scholarly activity parallel to other scholarly activities such as research and service have in turn become increasingly important. Highly influential authors such as Selden1 have proposed that faculty develop teaching portfolios as one way to achieve the goal of documenting teaching as a scholarly activity. Selden defines a faculty teaching portfolio as “a factual description of a professor’s teaching strengths and accomplishments. It includes documents and materials which collectively suggest the scope and quality of a professor’s teaching performance. It is to teaching what lists of publications, grants, and honors are to research and scholarship1.”

The purpose of this paper is to present a study that focuses on how 16 colleges and universities across the United States have incorporated teaching portfolios into their institutions. Because the process of creating a personal teaching portfolio can be challenging, many institutions provide guidance to graduate students and faculty who are developing teaching portfolios. In order to provide the best resources for new engineering educators interested in creating teaching portfolios, we explored what help and support these various teaching portfolio initiatives provided for their clients. This paper will first describe the two most common types of teaching portfolios in terms of their purpose, audience, and what elements they might contain. Next, we will present four reasons why engineering faculty, post-docs, and graduate students might want to build teaching portfolios. We will then describe the methods we used to select the institutions in our study sample and obtain information about their teaching portfolio initiatives. Finally, we will present our findings and summarize them in Table 1, which may be found in the Appendix.

Background

While it is difficult to differentiate the type of teaching portfolio (e.g. persuasive vs. formative) from its purpose, the following two sections will attempt to do just that. The first section will define different types of teaching portfolios, discuss their potential audiences and describe how they might be useful to engineering educators. The second section will explore specific reasons

Yellin, J., & Huang, Y., & Turns, J., & Tsuruda, C. (2006, June), Teaching Portfolios In Academia – How Are They Used? Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--1156

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