Asee peer logo

Teamwork: Implications For New Faculty

Download Paper |

Conference

1998 Annual Conference

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 28, 1998

Start Date

June 28, 1998

End Date

July 1, 1998

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

3.542.1 - 3.542.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7464

Download Count

37

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

Stephanie G. Adams

author page

Karan L. Watson

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1275

Teamwork: Implications for New Faculty By Stephanie G. Adams, Karan L. Watson, Ph.D.; Texas A&M University

Abstract In recent years, organizations in the United States have searched for ways to improve their overall effectiveness. No topic has garnered more discussion as an option than that of teams. There are many types of teams being utilized in organizations. However, in the last decade work teams have become one of the most popular types of teams. Work teams have been credited with increasing productivity, reducing costs, boosting moral, improving organizational flexibility and a flattening of the organizational structure. The cornerstones, research and teaching, of the faculty culture are dominated by individuals, not teams. The nature of higher education is to place emphasis on the accomplishments of the isolated individual rather than on team efforts. The emergence of teams in the academy will cause an increase in the administrative responsibility of faculty, a redistribution in the power and authority of faculty members and a reprioritization of work load and philosophy about teams. Engineering faculty members are often uncomfortable with the collaborative nature of teamwork. Indeed, the personality traits that characterize some engineering faculty interferes with their ability to be effective contributors in team ventures. This article will chronicle the evolution of teams, the emergence of teams in higher education and the expectations for engineering faculty members with regards to teamwork. This information will be beneficial for new engineering faculty as they embark on a new career where the infrastructure is changing.

Introduction

In recent years, organizations in the United States have searched for ways to improve

their overall effectiveness. No topic has garnered more discussion as an option than that of

teams. The results from the use of teams are numerous. Teams are often recognized as an

effective way to manage change, improve overall effectiveness, reduce costs, increase

productivity and increase employee satisfaction. Teams have been key organizational elements

in the design and execution of strategic management initiatives1.

Adams, S. G., & Watson, K. L. (1998, June), Teamwork: Implications For New Faculty Paper presented at 1998 Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington. https://peer.asee.org/7464

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 1998 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015