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Technological Literacy as an Element in the Structure, Assessment, and Evaluation of Engineering and Engineering Technology Degree Programs

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engineering and Technological Literacy: Past and Future

Tagged Division

Technological and Engineering Literacy/Philosophy of Engineering

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

25.1266.1 - 25.1266.10

DOI

10.18260/1-2--22023

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22023

Download Count

146

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Paper Authors

biography

John W. Blake P.E. Austin Peay State University

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John Blake is an Associate Professor in the Department of Engineering Technology at Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, Tenn. He served as Department Chair from 1994-2005. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Northwestern University, and is a registered Professional Engineer in the state of Tennessee.

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Abstract

Technological Literacy as an Element in the Structure, Assessment, and Evaluation of Engineering and Engineering Technology Degree ProgramsThe goal of teaching technological literacy is to foster greater technological literacy in society.Efforts in this area have been focused largely on developing technological literacy in studentswho are not majoring in engineering or engineering technology.Our majors need to be technologically literate as well. While meeting the specific educationalgoals of the major area, the program curriculum in engineering and engineering technologydegree programs also needs to help students develop general technological literacy. Theseconcepts and dimensions should be considered and included in the design of individual coursesand the curriculum.Concepts of technological literacy are implicit in ABET accreditation criteria for programs inengineering and engineering technology. Each course is expected to contribute to meetingaccreditation criteria, and most, if not all, courses are expected to contribute in different areas,including areas that are linked to technological literacy. Criteria for both types of program canbe matched to dimensions of technological literacy, and these dimensions can be a usefulframework for assessment and evaluation. These dimensions should be considered whenrevising courses and the curriculum to address issues raised in this process.This paper will explore the use of the concept and dimensions of technological literacy as a guidefor revising and improving individual courses and the curriculum as a whole. This will includediscussion of efforts to apply this framework to existing courses ranging from first year to senioryear courses in a four year degree program in engineering technology and to identifying placeswhere elements of technological literacy could be added to enhance instruction. This work onspecific courses will then be linked to the curriculum as a whole. Finally, assessment of theprogress made by students in developing technological literacy will be discussed.

Blake, J. W. (2012, June), Technological Literacy as an Element in the Structure, Assessment, and Evaluation of Engineering and Engineering Technology Degree Programs Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. 10.18260/1-2--22023

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