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Technological Literacy in Required Science Courses for Non-STEM Students in a Community College with Extension to Junior High School Environment

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Innovations in Promoting Technological Literacy II

Tagged Divisions

Liberal Education/Engineering & Society and Technological and Engineering Literacy/Philosophy of Engineering

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

25.1267.1 - 25.1267.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22024

Download Count

38

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Paper Authors

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Vazgen Shekoyan Queensborough Community College, CUNY

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Todd Holden Queensborough Community College, CUNY

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Todd Holden is an Associate Professor in the Physics Department of Queensborough Community College of CUNY. His current research interests include bioinformatics and microbial fuel cells. He also mentors student research projects.

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Raul Armendariz Ph.D. Queensborough Community College, CUNY

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Helio Takai Brookhaven National Laboratory

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Helio Takai is an Elementary Particle and Nuclear Physicist with interest in development of instrumentation for the detection of elementary particles. Takai is an Adjunct Professor at Stony Brook University.

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Sunil Dehipawala Queensborough Community College, CUNY

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Sunil Dehipawala received his B.S. degree from University of Peradeniya in Sri Lanka and Ph.D from City University of New York. Currently, he is working as a faculty member at Queensborough Community College of CUNY.

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Dimitrios S. Kokkinos Ph.D. Queensborough Community College, CUNY

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Dimitrios Kokkinos, Department of Physics, Queensborough Community College of CUNY, Bayside, NY 11364. Phone: 718-281-5708; Fax: 718-631-6608; Email: dkokkinos@qcc.cuny.edu. Professional Preparation: Graduate Center of the City University of New York, electrical engineering, Ph.D., 1984; Graduate Center of the City University of New York, electrical engineering, M.E., 1981; the City College of the City University of New York, electrical engineering, B.E., 1977; and University of Patras (Greece), physics, B.S., 1973. Appointments: Queensborough Community College of CUNY, 2009-present, Assistant Professor of physics, Queensborough Community College of CUNY, 2006-2008, Subst. Assistsnt Professor of physics, Queensborough Community College of CUNY, 1990-2005, Adjunct Assistant Professor of physics, Verizon Communications Science & Technology, 1986-2006, Dist. Member Technical Staff (DMTS), AT&T Bell Laboratories, 1984-1986, Member Technical Staff (MTS), the City College of CUNY, 1976-1984, Research Assistant, electrical engineering, and University of Patras (Greece), 1972-1974, lecturer and Research Fellow, physics. Selected Publications: D. Kokkinos, S. Ahmed, "Atmospheric Depolarization of LIDAR Backscattered Signals," Proc. International Conference Lasers' 88, pp. 538-545, 1989. H. Izadpanah, D. Kokkinos, K. Ogawa, "Field Tests of 10 Gbit/s Transmission On Embedded Standard Fiber," Technical Digest, National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference, pp. 1176-1186, March 1995. V. O’Byrne, D. Kokkinos, D. Meis, D. Piehler, F. Coppinger, L. Pender, “UPC vs. APC Connector Performance in Passive Optical Networks,” Technical Digest, Optical Fiber Communications/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference, paper NTuF3, March 2005. D. Kokkinos, C. Saravanos, “SC/APC Fiber optic Connectors Connected and Disconnected Under High Optical Power,” Technical Digest, Optical Fiber Communications/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference, paper NTuA5, March 2006. D. Kokkinos, M. Lane, D. Chen, “Managing Fiber Connections in Next Generation Network and Applications,” Technical Digest, Optical Fiber Communications/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference, paper NThA1, March 2007. Selected Patents: “Optical Signal Shutoff Mechanism and Associated System," Pat.#7,912,369, March 22, 2011. “Automated Testing and Analysis of Dense WDM Switching Devices," Pat.#7,769,292, Aug. 3, 2010. “Testing a Fiber Link in a Communication System without Interrupting Service," Pat.# 7,561,798, July 14, 2009. “Methods and Apparatus for Automated Testing and Analysis of Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM), Wavelength Selective and/or Optical Switching Devices,” Pat. # 7,340,166, March 4, 2008. “Multimedia Distribution System Using Fiber Optic Lines”, Pat. # 6,055,077, April 25, 2000. Synergistic Activities: curriculum development in physics, Designed a partially online laboratory in physics for Queensborough Community College (2010); member of doctoral examination committees in the area of optical remote sensing (LIDAR systems) at EE Department of the City College of CUNY since 1984; and participation in NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program at Queensborough Community College, 2009-present. Collaborators: S. Ahmed (City College of CUNY); C. Saravanos (Corning); H. Izadpanah and K. Ogawa (AT&T Bell Labs); and V. O’Byrne, M. Lane, J. Sylvester, J. Needle, and J. Beierle (Verizon Communications). Gaduate Advisor: Samir Ahmed, the City College of CUNY.

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Regina Sullivan Queensborough Community College, CUNY

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George Tremberger Jr Queensborough Community College, CUNY

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Paul J. Marchese Queensborough Community College, CUNY

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David H. Lieberman Queensborough Community College, CUNY

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Tak Cheung Queensborough Community College, CUNY

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Tak Cheung, Ph.D., professor of physics, teaches in CUNY Queensborough Community College. He also conducts research and mentors student research projects.

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Abstract

American Society Energizing Education submissionJune 10-14 San Antonio, Texas 2012Technological literacy in required science courses for non-STEM students in acommunity college with extension to junior high school environmentAbstractTechnology literacy is an important outcome for a non-STEM student taking a requiredscience course to function effectively in our technology driven economy. Thedevelopment of technological literacy in a non-STEM science course benefited from ourexperience in teaching engineering technology courses and practical field training withstudents. Social technological issues such as the pros and cons of various energy sources,genetically modified food, etc. are crucial elements for choices in a democratic society.The understanding of a current personal technological device/gadget and the pivotalscience based technology for the expected next generation product would drive themarket surveying results with positive effect on the economy. Such emphases have beentaught in the two science courses, principles of astronomy and space, and principles ofphysics. Examples in imaging, remote sensing and control, wireless communication,fusion, radioactive dating, etc. have been used to deliver technological literacy in threecognitive dimensions of knowledge, capabilities, and critical thinking and decision-making; consistent with the recommendation of National Academy of Engineering(NAE). The astronomy course with NASA priority and operation discussion has beenfound to be suitable in fulfilling the five technological literacy expectationsrecommended by International Technology Education Association (ITEA), in addition tothe usual science literacy requirement. Junior high school science sessions have beenconducted with the inclusion of technological literacy as well, and our preliminaryfindings suggest that technological literacy would promote parents’ interests andencouragement for STEM majors in their families.

Shekoyan, V., & Holden, T., & Armendariz, R., & Takai, H., & Dehipawala, S., & Kokkinos, D. S., & Sullivan, R., & Tremberger, G., & Marchese, P. J., & Lieberman, D. H., & Cheung, T. (2012, June), Technological Literacy in Required Science Courses for Non-STEM Students in a Community College with Extension to Junior High School Environment Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/22024

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