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Temporary Loads During Construction: Undergraduate Research And Course Development

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Curriculum Development in Civil Engineering Technology

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

13.1195.1 - 13.1195.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4160

Download Count

3622

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Paper Authors

biography

William Wood Youngstown State University

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Dr. Wood is Professor of Civil & Construction Engineering Technology and Director of the School of Engineering Technology at Youngstown State University, Youngstown, Ohio 44555.

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biography

David Kurtanich Youngstown State University

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Mr. Kurtanich is Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Civil & Construction Engineering Technology program in the School of Engineering Technology at Youngstown State University, Youngstown, Ohio 44555.

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biography

Robert Di Rienzo Youngstown State University

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Mr. DiRienzo is a graduate of the Civil & Construction Engineering Technology program at Youngstown State University. He is curently a Project Engineer at Taylor Engineering, Inc. Jacksonville, FL 32256, USA

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Temporary Loads During Construction: Undergraduate Research And Course Development

Abstract

Teaching models have evolved as research on learning has progressed. Kolb and Felder championed a learning styles paradigm while Dale developed a “Cone of Learning” model to address teaching styles. To maximize the learning experience for one talented undergraduate, we developed a project that required active leaning by the student and opened the potential for improvement of the Civil & Construction Engineering Technology curriculum. Understanding design loading requirements and combinations of loads is a challenging part of the design process, yet it is often not emphasized in undergraduate engineering or engineering technology curriculum. Application of ASCE 7, Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures is often an incidental part of one or more design courses. Its proper application, however, requires significant class time so that students can gain the proper understanding of its many facets. Consideration of transient loads imposed during the construction process receives even less attention. Design for these loads is generally dismissed as “means and methods” which are the responsibility of the contractor. However, many graduates are employed by contractors or consultants working for contractors. Understanding that there is a difference between design loads and construction loads is, therefore, relevant and important. This paper looks at construction loads in accordance with ASCE 37, Design Loads on Structures During Construction and is based on an independent project undertaken by a student. He was tasked with researching the topic and preparing a set of notes for presentation to an undergraduate engineering technology class. This paper presents a summary of the topic to show how an undergraduate student would present the material. A review of the material prepared by the student provides insight into the level of understanding of this topic that can be achieved through active independent study and highlights the need for civil and construction engineering technology programs to include discussion of this topic..

Introduction

Teaching models have evolved as research on learning has progressed. Kolb1 and Felder2 championed a learning styles paradigm to explain that learning optimization cannot be utilizing a single teaching approach each individual may learn differently. Dale3 developed a “Cone of Learning” model that addresses teaching styles and their effectiveness on how students learn. To maximize the learning experience for one talented undergraduate, we developed a project that required active leaning by the student and opened the potential for improvement of the Civil & Construction Engineering Technology curriculum at the institution. Because the project was initiated in conjunction with some undergraduate research on masonry walls, the student’s initial work references some masonry-specific items such as wall bracing. This paper presents an edited condensation of his effort and is intended to demonstrate the depth and breadth of

Wood, W., & Kurtanich, D., & Di Rienzo, R. (2008, June), Temporary Loads During Construction: Undergraduate Research And Course Development Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/4160

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2008 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015