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The Design Of An Experimental Anaerobic Digestor For Organic Waste Processing

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Alternative Energy Source Projects

Tagged Division

Energy Conversion and Conservation

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

13.1210.1 - 13.1210.18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4208

Download Count

21

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Paper Authors

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Esther Ososanya University of the District of Columbia

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Abiose Adebayo University of the District of Columbia

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Jean-Pierre Fodjouo University of the District of Columbia

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Steven Omoijuanfo University of the District of Columbia

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Francis Ayissi University of the District of Columbia

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Tuan Ly University of the District of Columbia

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Kevin Allen University of the District of Columbia

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Mamoun Mohammed Ali University of the District of Columbia

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Gizaw Mulugeta University of the District of Columbia

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Anene Wynn University of the District of Columbia

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Dimitri Ditombi Bamba University of the District of Columbia

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Meraj Shaikh University of the District of Columbia

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Abstract: Biogas is produced when organic matter is degraded in the absence of oxygen. The process, from degradation to gas production is called anaerobic digestion. This anaerobic digestion occurs naturally in wetland, Lake Bottom and deep landfills. An experimental digestor was built that converts cow manure and agricultural waste into methane-rich biogas that can be used as alternate energy resources to generate electricity or thermal energy. The research in this study focuses on the feasibility of the design of an operational digestor, the monitoring and control of the different biodegradation process variables and experiments to boost or maximize the gas production; and the analysis of the biogas produced, using a Gas Chromatograph (CG), with Flame Ionization Detector (FID), to separate the methane from carbon dioxide. The biogas produced contains Methane CH4, with very small percentage of Carbon dioxide CO2, and some traces of Nitrogen N2, Hydrogen H2, and Hydrogen Sulfide H2SO4. The economic viability of this technology, advantages, and the production cost compared to other renewable energy resources are also compared. This technology will be used to power the heating unit in a Zero Energy Home (ZEH) currently under construction.

Introduction:

The first phase of the Anaerobic digestor design project takes students through the engineering design process, i.e., the conceptual design and analysis, and design feasibility study. The second phase was to build the experimental digestor system, the pro engineer drawing, and construction of an operational digestor.

The Design Process:

The design process is a decision making process in which several steps are taken to

reach a desired goal, objective or final design so as to satisfy a definite goal or stated

objective. The fundamental elements of such design processes are the establishment of

objectives and criteria, synthesis, analysis, construction, testing and evaluation. Like any

other engineering design the Anaerobic Digestor design follows these fundamental

processes. The desire or need of finding a suitable heating system for a Zero Energy

Home (ZEH) that is efficient, cost effective and uses a form of renewable energy, led to

the option of the Anaerobic Digestor. Research was done on other types of residential

Ososanya, E., & Adebayo, A., & Fodjouo, J., & Omoijuanfo, S., & Ayissi, F., & Ly, T., & Allen, K., & Mohammed Ali, M., & Mulugeta, G., & Wynn, A., & Ditombi Bamba, D., & Shaikh, M. (2008, June), The Design Of An Experimental Anaerobic Digestor For Organic Waste Processing Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/4208

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